English / Year 10 / Literature / Responding to literature

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Curriculum content descriptions

Reflect on, extend, endorse or refute others’ interpretations of and responses to literature (ACELT1640)

Elaborations
  • determining, through debate, whether a text possesses universal qualities and remains relevant
  • presenting arguments based on close textual analysis to support an interpretation of a text, for example writing an essay or creating a set of director’s notes
  • creating personal reading lists in a variety of genres and explain why the texts qualify for inclusion on a particular list
  • reflecting upon and asking questions about interpretations of texts relevant to a student’s cultural background
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Personal responses,  Reasoning

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The influence of context on our reading choices

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Online

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Video

Macbeth: are you a man or a mouse?

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Video

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