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English / Year 10 / Literature / Responding to literature

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Reflect on, extend, endorse or refute others’ interpretations of and responses to literature (ACELT1640)

Elaborations
  • determining, through debate, whether a text possesses universal qualities and remains relevant
  • presenting arguments based on close textual analysis to support an interpretation of a text, for example writing an essay or creating a set of director’s notes
  • creating personal reading lists in a variety of genres and explain why the texts qualify for inclusion on a particular list
  • reflecting upon and asking questions about interpretations of texts relevant to a student’s cultural background
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Personal responses,  Reasoning

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Lies, deceit and bad driving in 'The Great Gatsby'

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Navigating 'The Secret River'

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The great Gatsby meets Willy Loman

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Tragic love triangle in 'The Great Gatsby'

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Rethinking drinking alcohol

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Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis': perfect fiction?

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Joan London's 'Gilgamesh': a literary journey

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Richard Flanagan - being a courageous writer

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Social satire: David Williamson's 'After the Ball'

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The value of Shakespeare

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Audio

Did Shakespeare really write his plays?

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