English / Year 5 / Literature / Creating literature

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Create literary texts that experiment with structures, ideas and stylistic features of selected authors (ACELT1798)

Elaborations
  • drawing upon fiction elements in a range of model texts - for example main idea, characterisation, setting (time and place), narrative point of view; and devices, for example figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification), as well as non-verbal conventions in digital and screen texts - in order to experiment with new, creative ways of communicating ideas, experiences and stories in literary texts
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Creating texts,  Text structure

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites: types of sentences

A web page resource with information, teacher guides and activities on types of sentences to support the Australian Curriculum in English K–10. It has detailed activities, links to resources and quizzes.

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites: Visual literacy

A resource with information, study guides and resources on visual literacy to support the English K-10 Australian Curriculum in English. It provides a series of activities, guidelines and tasks about visual texts from a variety of sources. Contains writing scaffolds, templates and proformas for responding and composing ...

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites – responding to literature

A web page with information, teacher guides and resources on responding to texts. This resource supports the NSW English K-10 syllabus.

Interactive resource

Character maker: visual attributes

Build animated characters for a new cartoon show. Choose visual attributes to communicate information about your cartoon character’s personality to the audience. Choose shapes and items to suit a character's personality. Combine elements such as body shape, head size, clothing and accessories. For example, choose a relatively ...

Moving Image

Story development and plot holes with Andy Griffiths

How do you move your characters forward in a story? A trick Andy Griffiths uses is asking a lot of questions. His favourite question to ask is "what's the worst thing that can happen next?" Try asking yourself that question if you get stuck when writing your next story. In this clip Andy also talks about plot holes. What ...

Moving Image

Write with Emily Rodda!

Did you know that ideas for stories can come from just about anywhere? Emily Rodda even wrote a book about her dog! See if you can come up with an idea, characters and settings to create your own story. Remember, reading and practising a lot helps!

Moving Image

Andy Griffiths' writing tips

Watch this clip as Andy Griffiths offers his tips on how to write a story. See if you can come up with your own story that begins with you opening a box marked, "DO NOT OPEN". What's in the box? What happens next? Keep in mind Andy's three tips!

Moving Image

Problem solving with Morris Gleitzman!

How do you write a story? Morris Gleitzman starts by finding a character and giving his character a problem to solve. Along the way, he creates obstacles and tries to figure out how the character will go about overcoming the obstacles and eventually solve the problem. See if you can create your own character who has to ...

Moving Image

Characters as friends

Do you agree with Morris Gleitzman when he says that characters you create are like friends? How hard do you think it is to put your characters through difficult situations and make them suffer if you feel this way?

Interactive resource

Show and tell: here, boy!

Watch a short cartoon about a dog in a backyard. Select phrases to create sentences and build a basic factual recount. Rearrange the phrases to create the best word order in the sentences. Who was involved? What did they do? When, where or how did they do it? Add adjectives and adverbs to make the story clearer and funnier. ...

Assessment resource

Improve our town: arguments: assessment

Test your understanding of the arguments concerning a community issue. Help a local council decide on a development proposal. Determine whether the best use of a demolition site in the centre of town will be for a park or for a mall. Talk to people in the local community to find out their opinions. Restate the reasons given ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Super stories: The Abandoned House: nouns and adjectives

Help a publishing director create a bestselling horror story. Read the story. Choose effective nouns and adjectives to increase the impact of the story and make it scarier. Select illustrations that highlight the horror of the events. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Super stories: The Abandoned House: verbs and adverbs

Help a publishing director create a bestselling horror story. Read the story. Choose effective verbs and adverbs to increase the impact of the story by making it scarier. Select illustrations that highlight the horror of the events.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Rainforest: make a walking track

Mark the route for a walking track on a map of a rainforest. Choose a section of track based on instructions about distances, compass directions and grid references. Keep adding sections of track to get to the rest house. As you go, look up the meaning of tricky words.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Show and tell: that cat

Watch a short cartoon about a cat chasing a bird. Select noun groups, verb groups and phrases to create sentences and build a basic factual recount. Rearrange the word groups to create the best order in the sentences. Who was involved? What did they do? When, where or how did they do it? Add adjectives and adverbs to make ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Finish the story: bushfire

Edit a comic book story to make it more exciting and complete. Look closely at a narrative about an adventure where a couple driving home are trapped by a bushfire. Choose an ending. Improve the story by adding adverbs, choosing verbs and changing nouns to pronouns. Choose a title and image for the cover.

Collection

Create interesting writing

This collection of 16 digital curriculum resources provides activities and ideas to develop students' writing skills. It includes focused interactive activities to improve students' writing and to help them to engage audience interest through the use of effective adjectives, adverbs, verbs, metaphors, similes and plot structures. ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Patrick Brennan: the legend of Ned Kelly

Play the role of a reporter in 1881. Produce a feature article for a newspaper about the life of Ned Kelly. Review a brief history. Interview his friends and enemies. Gather evidence of social and political influences that affected Ned Kelly’s life. Compile an article that explores the myth and decide whether Ned Kelly ...

Interactive resource

Dream machine: similes

Build a dream bike using fantasy parts such as a 'time-travel frame' and 'supersonic jet pedals'. Look at a model text that uses similes to describe a 'Wish-come-true bike'. Choose similes to make an interesting description of your own fantasy bike. This learning object is one in a series of two objects.

Assessment resource

Super stories: verbs and adverbs: assessment

Assess your ability to choose effective verbs, adverbs and illustrations to increase the impact of a horror story and make it scarier. Explain the reasoning behind some of your choices.