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Humanities and social sciences / Year 2 / Inquiry and skills / Analysing

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Interpret data and information displayed in pictures and texts and on maps (ACHASSI040)

Elaborations
  • interpreting distance on maps using terms such as ‘metres’, ‘distant’, ‘close’, ‘local’, ‘many hours in a bus/car/plane’, ‘walking distance’ to decide on the accessibility of different features and places
  • interpreting flowcharts and geographic and concept maps to explore system connections (for example, places members of their class are connected to, where some food comes from, how Aboriginal songlines connect places)
  • interpreting symbols and codes that provide information (for example, map legends)
  • explaining what intangible boundaries mean or why they exist (for example, the equator as a division on a globe, out-of-bounds areas shown on a plan of the school)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Maps (Geographic location),  Classification

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