Close message Scootle has stopped supporting resources that use the Adobe Flash plug-in from 18 Dec 2020. Learning paths that include these resources will have alerts to notify teachers and students that one or more of the resources will be unavailable. Click here for more info.

Humanities and social sciences / Year 3 / Inquiry and skills / Evaluating and reflecting

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Reflect on learning to propose actions in response to an issue or challenge and consider possible effects of proposed actions (ACHASSI060)

Elaborations
  • recalling what they know when contributing ideas to a group response to a community challenge (for example, planning how to celebrate a unrecognised cultural event; such as how local Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Peoples celebrate their Country/Place or how to retell a historical event from a silent or unfamiliar voice)
  • reflecting on anticipated effects of actions designed to protect and improve places that people perceive as important (for example, places of environmental value, cultural value or historic significance)
  • choosing and enacting roles for group work that recognise an awareness of members’ knowledge and skills and customs
  • considering the findings of an inquiry when developing a plan of action to achieve a set goal (for example, to protect a place, to participate in a community festival or commemoration, to raise awareness about an issue, to raise money for a purpose)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Heritage,  Conservation (Environment)

Refine by resource type

Refine by year level


Refine by learning area


Refine by topic

Related topic * No suggestions
Video

Ancient Chinese civilisation

The basin of Huang He, or the Yellow River, is considered the birthplace of Ancient China. What did this ancient civilisation have in common with other ancient civilisations? New advances in science and technology are traits of a civilisation. How did iron smelting revolutionise farming for the ancient Chinese?

Video

Exporting uranium and threats to the Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is facing many threats, and a new uranium mine in Queensland might add to the pressure. This clip from early in 2013 looks at what uranium exports from a proposed uranium port in Townsville could mean for the Reef. It presents views about the management of pressures placed on this World Heritage Site ...

Video

Indus Valley Civilisation

The Indus River is located in present-day Pakistan and is the birthplace of the Indus Valley Civilisation. What do we know of this civilisation? What are some characteristics of this civilisation that are similar to that of other river valley civilisations? Why do we know less of the Indus Valley Civilisation than we do ...

Video

Elephant tusks: blessing or curse?

Did you know that an elephant's tusks are its teeth? Tusks are a useful tool. See how elephants use them for foraging and digging or as weapons. Unfortunately, tusks are highly prized by hunters. Find out how the trade in elephant tusks (ivory) impacts the elephant population. What is being done to protect these majestic animals?

Video

Beetles threaten heritage elms

Imagine a tiny beetle causing the defoliation and even death of mature elm trees that have been growing in Tasmania for up to 150 years. Watch this clip to discover how the elm beetle is wiping out these old trees within Tasmania's heritage gardens. Find out also what arborists are doing to try to minimise the damage and ...

Video

Mother Mekong

Discover the connections between people and ancient temples hidden along the mighty Mekong River. Find out how long the temple Wat Phu (Vat Phou) has been a place of worship. Consider the spiritual value of this river, which provides more than sustenance and money.

Video

The role of the Nile in Ancient Egypt

Like other early civilisations, the rise of Ancient Egypt was dependent on the fertile land around a river. By learning about and adapting to the conditions of the Nile River, ancient Egyptians were able to increase their agricultural productivity to support a large population. Why was this vital for a civilisation to flourish?

Video

Ashoka the Great is for real

Imagine the excitement of discovering evidence that a great ancient ruler, whose story was believed to be a legend, was in fact a real historical figure. This clip looks at the Mauryan Empire in ancient India and the reign of Ashoka the Great, one of the most remarkable rulers in world history. This clip is the first in ...

Video

Why did people leave the Indus Valley?

Discover an ancient Indian civilisation that was excavated less than a century ago. This clip focuses on archaeological sources from the Indus Valley cities of Mohenjo-daro and Harappa and discusses theories about why these ancient cities were deserted around 1600 BCE. This clip is the last in a series of four.

Video

Whadjuk country

Ever wondered what life was like for the traditional owners of Perth before the British arrived in 1829? Whadjuk [pronounced wod-JUK] Noongar Elder and ambassador Dr Noel Nannup talks about traditional Whadjuk ways of life and key cultural places in Perth, and he teaches us the Noongar words for some Perth suburbs (such ...

Video

World War I: the dead man's penny

Imagine the feelings of a family when they learn of the death of a son during World War I. How might they react to receiving a giant penny for a life sacrificed? This ABC Open program explores the role of the 'dead man's penny', the token given by the British government to many families of British and Commonwealth troops ...

Video

Landslides along the Three Gorges Dam

The world's largest dam project is set to bring enormous benefits to the Chinese economy. But there's a potential side-effect of altering the natural system - the likelihood that more geological disasters such as landslides will occur in the area. Find out why in this clip from 2008.

Video

Surviving the extremes

What would you do if a natural disaster was heading for you? Would you panic? Dr Jonica Newby and the Catalyst team stage two disaster scenarios and throw them at two Australian families who know only that a disaster of some kind is coming. How will they cope? And how would you?

Video

Mungo man goes home

The discovery of Mungo Man in 1974 rewrote history by revealing that Aboriginal people had been in Australia twice as long as previously thought. Named after the location at which it was found, the skeleton is around 42,000 years old. When discovered in 1974, Mungo Man was moved to a university in Canberra for scientific ...

Video

Wartime letters from Afghanistan, Anzac Day 2013

It is heartbreaking to revisit letters or messages from those we have lost. Watch and listen to this ABC broadcast from the 2013 Anzac Day Dawn Service in Canberra. Victoria Cross recipient Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith reads aloud some very moving letters written by Australian soldiers in Afghanistan, along with tributes ...

Video

War of the willows

A willow tree removal program in the ACT has erupted into a war of words. At the heart of this clash of ideas are different opinions about the best way to protect the landscape. While the government sees the willow as a weed, others view it as an important environmental resource. Which environmental world view will prevail?

Video

Books that changed the world: 'Silent Spring'

Have you ever thought that a book could be so powerful that it could change the world? Discover how the biologist Rachel Carson's book 'Silent Spring' led to the banning of toxic agricultural chemicals and launched the modern environment movement.

Video

Aboriginal astronomy

Many ancient cultures studied the night sky, and we know this because it is reflected in some of the earliest stories we have on record. Learn about one of these stories in this video. Other than the Dreamtime stories, what other evidence might there be that the Aboriginal people studied the stars?

Video

Frog relocation

Did you know that the site of the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney is also home to the appropriately named Green and Golden Bell Frog? Watch this clip to find out how Olympic planners worked with the Australian Museum to relocate frogs to a protected, nearby habitat.

Video

Warratyi, prehistoric site

A rock shelter in the Flinders Range, called Warratyi, has proven to be an important prehistoric site. Learn how dating of artefacts and fossils from the site has changed our previous conceptions of human settlement and technology, and even our interactions with megafauna.