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Humanities and social sciences / Year 4 / Inquiry and skills / Researching

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Sequence information about people‚Äôs lives and events (ACHASSI076)

Elaborations
  • creating a timeline by accurately placing information about key events or people in chronological order and explaining the sequence
  • using graphic organisers to show the sequential stages of a process (for example, a flowchart that shows the stages of local government decision-making; a consequence wheel that shows causes and effects; seasonal charts such as an Aboriginal representation describing environmental evidence)
  • recounting and sequencing events associated with a particular history (for example, developing an annotated map to describe the sea route of the First Fleet and the timing of its passage)
General capabilities
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Chronological order,  Historical periods

Assessment

Year 4 history assessment - First contacts: A First Fleet story

This is an assessment package that uses the Year 4 Australian Curriculum history achievement standard to gather evidence about how well students have demonstrated what they know, what they understand and what they can do in relation to the topic 'First Contacts'. Students use historical sources to research the life of an ...

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Expeditions return home from 'New Holland'

Discover what happens when the expeditions of Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin return home. Both explorers brought back detailed maps and specimens, including live kangaroos and emus, from 'New Holland'. How will each explorer be celebrated and remembered? Watch this clip to find out.

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Eora: mapping Aboriginal Sydney, 1770-1850

Why are artworks viewed as important sources of historical information? In this clip, you will see a range of artworks created about and by the Eora people, the original inhabitants of Port Jackson (site of today's Sydney Harbour). These artworks were part of a State Library of NSW exhibition in 2006, which was designed ...

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The Battle of Hastings, again!

How was England changed forever by one battle in 1066? In that year, a Norman army led by Duke William of Normandy sailed to England and defeated the Saxon army of Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings. Visit the site of the battle during a re-enactment by medieval history buffs. This is the first of two clips.

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Australia decides: monarchy or republic?

A constitution is the set of rules under which a country is governed. Do you know what a referendum is or what it means to be a constitutional monarchy or a republic? In 1999, Australian voters decided whether the nation would remain a constitutional monarchy or become a republic. Watch as ordinary Australians express their ...

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Dirty tricks in 1066

How was William of Normandy able to defeat the Saxon army of Harold Godwinson in 1066 and become the king of England? The Norman's victory at Hastings marked the beginning of their complete conquest of England over the following few years. Discover the tactics of both sides in the Battle of Hastings. This clip is the second ...

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Keeping ancient Romans clean and healthy

How did people keep clean in ancient Rome when most people lived in small flats with no plumbing or running water? How did they keep healthy in a time when only the rich could afford doctors and medical knowledge was lacking? Discover the extraordinarily advanced world of Roman engineering that produced public baths, toilets, ...

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Always check your sources

What better place can you imagine for a Library of Knowledge, where the answers to all questions can be found, than beneath the paws of the Sphinx? Sounds perfect. But how reliable are your sources of information? Make up your own mind as you watch this clip about ancient Egypt's legendary hall of records.

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Lured by fossils

Dinosaur fossils capture the imagination of all kinds of people, leading some to a lifetime of research and theorising. Find out about the devotion of two families whose examination of Australia's fossil record has contributed to understanding the geology and evolution of life here.

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Unlocking the identity of the Sphinx

What is known about the origins of the Sphinx? Do we know who built it and who it might resemble? Watch as forensic pathologists seek to determine which pharaoh might have commissioned the building of the Sphinx, then listen to reasons why the pathologists' findings might not be conclusive.

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Who broke the Sphinx's nose?

For many years the troops of French military commander Napoleon Bonaparte were blamed for mutilating the nose of the Sphinx. In this clip, historical sources are used to bring this conclusion into dispute. Listen as Dr Zahi Hawass, archaeologist, Egyptologist, author, and former minister of state for antiquities in Egypt, ...

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Knights

Who were medieval knights? How did you become a knight and what did a knight have to do? A medieval knight didn't just ride about on a war horse in shiny armour, go on crusade or joust in a tournament. Medieval knights had important responsibilities and duties to carry out.

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Trebuchets and sieges

In medieval wars the trebuchet and other siege engines were used to attack castles and destroy defences. Trebuchets catapulted huge boulders, smashing down walls. They could also be used to fire diseased bodies and dead animals into a besieged castle or walled city.

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Ancient Chinese civilisation

The basin of Huang He, or the Yellow River, is considered the birthplace of Ancient China. What did this ancient civilisation have in common with other ancient civilisations? New advances in science and technology are traits of a civilisation. How did iron smelting revolutionise farming for the ancient Chinese?

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Being an Aboriginal student in the 1960s

Listen to Stan Grant Snr, Marcia Langton and Sol Bellear as they share their school experiences. How would you describe what they experienced? How do their memories make you feel? Why do you think these things happened to them? And what effect do you think their experiences would have had on them?

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The Mighty Aztecs

Who were the Mexihcah? Discover the rich and brutal history of the Aztec culture and the birth of Modern Mexico.

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Working for a living in Medieval England

Imagine being transported to England in the middle of the 13th century. What was life like for common people? Who had the power to control the lives of others? In this clip, learn about the feudal system, which was widespread in Medieval Europe. This clip is first in a series of five.

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A woman's life in Medieval Europe

What was life like for women in Medieval Europe? Did they enjoy the same rights and opportunities as men? In this clip, learn about the roles of peasant women and the lives they could expect to lead. This clip is one in a series of five.

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The Wave Hill walk-off: more than a wage dispute

Visit Wattie Creek at Wave Hill station in 1968. It is two years into the historic strike known as the 'Wave Hill walk-off' led by the Aboriginal Elder Vincent Lingiari. In this black-and-white clip made at the time, listen to Vincent Lingiari and other strikers discuss what they are fighting for. The manager of Wave Hill ...

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Good and bad medicine in Medieval Europe

How sophisticated was medical practice in Medieval Europe? In this clip, learn about common forms of diagnosis and cures for ailments in the 14th century. And brace yourself for a medieval-style amputation; it's not pretty. This clip is one in a series of five.