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Humanities and social sciences / Year 2 / Knowledge and Understanding / Geography

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples maintain special connections to particular Country/Place (ACHASSK049)

Elaborations
  • explaining that some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have special connections to many Countries/Places (for example, through marriage, birth, residence and chosen or forced movement)
  • discussing how some people are connected to one Country (for example, because it is “mother’s” Country or “father’s” Country)
  • describing the connections of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with the land, sea, waterways, sky and animals of their Country/Place, and how this influences their views on the use of environmental resources
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Cultural identity,  Sense of place,  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Video

Yaama Ghubhii: Indigenous Connect Song

Watch the students of Moree East Public School as they perform a song that welcomes people to Gamilaroi land in traditional languague. Listen to the words of the song. What are some of the things the students talk about in their song? What sort of instruments can you hear? How would you describe this style of music? Do ...

Interactive

Meeting at Kamay

This resource explores the perspectives of the Aboriginal people of Kamay Botany Bay and the men aboard the HMB Endeavour upon their meeting in 1770. It aims to help students understand the history of Australia's Aboriginal peoples and why stories of the past are important to all of us. This resource is one part of the ...

Interactive

How does your garden grow?

This Stage 2 resource grew from a conversation between young students questioning why they could still buy grapes if they were out of season. This wondering led to a discussion around when we grow certain fruit and vegetables. The original stimulus was extended to cover planting for the seasons and factors that influence ...

Video

The Buyungurra who didn't listen

Listen as Bianca McNeair shares the story of "The Buyungurra who didn't listen". This is a traditional story that Bianca's mother told her when she was growing up. Bianca uses words from the Malgana language, which is spoken in the area around Shark Bay in Western Australia.

Video

Name parts of the body in Dhurga

Watch and listen as students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya teach you how to name eight body parts in Dhurga. Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and Wallaga Lake.

Video

Indigenous seasons across northern Australia

Aboriginal communities across northern and western Australia have helped to develop seasonal calendars based on their ecological knowledge. The calendars link meteorological patterns with changes in plant and animal life across the year.

Video

Outback House: Mal's perspective

Imagine leaving your home to travel back to about 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on 'Oxley Downs', a sheep station built to look and work like an 1860s station. Join Mal Burns, a station hand and member of the Wiradjuri people, as he builds ...

Video

Australian culture in the 1960s

What was Australia like in the 1960s? Why does reporter Stan Grant say that "change is coming" at this time, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? Choose one of the people mentioned in this video and do some research into their sporting, artistic or political achievements.

Video

Harvesting and cooking murnong

Murnong is an edible Australian native plant that was prolific in south-eastern Australia. Which part of the murnong is eaten? Why was it so abundant in certain parts of Victoria? Watch Aunty Julie to learn how murnong is harvested and cooked.

Video

Postcard from Uluru

Many texts explore the connection people have to a particular place. In this clip, explore the beauty and majesty of Uluru and learn about the significance this sacred place holds for many Australians. Notice how visual language can be used to reinforce these ideas.

Video

Learn to count in Kaurna!

Presenter Taylor Power-Smith helps us learn to count to ten in Kaurna, the Indigenous language of the Kaurna people of Adelaide and the Adelaide Plains. 

Video

Mother Mekong

Discover the connections between people and ancient temples hidden along the mighty Mekong River. Find out how long the temple Wat Phu (Vat Phou) has been a place of worship. Consider the spiritual value of this river, which provides more than sustenance and money.

Video

Reef walk with Dorothy

Take a walk with Dorothy on the exposed reefs of West Kimberley, WA. If you look closely, you'll find strange and wondrous creatures hiding beneath the surface! What is it about reefs that make them such great places for so many different life forms?

Video

Why are coral reefs important?

Coral reefs contain a high biodiversity of marine life and they're vital natural assets for coastal communities and cultures. In this clip you will hear from a panel of scientific and community experts as they discuss the importance of coral reefs to billions of people around the world. Discover some perspectives on the ...

Video

How life can change

Explore the remarkable journey of Akram Azimi, the 2013 Young Australian of the Year, from Kabul in war-ravaged Afghanistan to Perth, WA, then to Looma, a remote Aboriginal community in the Kimberley. Learn how Akram developed a passion to help 'Australians have a deeper sense of connection to this land'. This short clip ...

Video

Asian and Australian: it's easy to be me

Many Australians are members of two cultures: the culture of their homes and the culture of society at large. In this Heywire clip, learn about the experiences of Michael Lam, whose Vietnamese Australian family lives in Townsville, Queensland.<br /><br />Could you write or record a story about yourself and/or your community? ...

Video

Trees and Country

Yuin, Bunurong and Tasmanian man Bruce Pascoe explains his connection to Country and introduces us to a family of trees. In what ways does Bruce’s relationship with the Earth differ from yours?

Video

Birds and totems

Yuin, Bunurong and Tasmanian man Bruce Pascoe shares his delight in encountering birds on Country. Bruce explains the significance of Umburra, or black duck, and his obligation to care for the species. Bruce explains that his brothers and sisters look after other animals, such as kangaroos, bream, wallabies, flathead and ...

Video

The explorers’ diaries

When Sir Thomas Mitchell and Sir George Grey explored unknown regions of Australia in the 19th century, they found sophisticated examples of agriculture practised by Indigenous peoples. Writer Bruce Pascoe considers why Aboriginal agriculture, economy and civilisation were not taught to generations of Australians. Do you ...

Video

World’s first bakers?

When did humans begin grinding seeds to make flour? Many people believe bread-making began in Egypt or Mesopotamia as long as 17,000 years ago. Archaeologists have recently found evidence that Indigenous Australians were producing flour 65,000 years ago. Were they the world’s first bakers?