Humanities and social sciences / Year 3 / Knowledge and Understanding / Geography

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Curriculum content descriptions

The representation of Australia as states and territories and as Countries/Places of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples; and major places in Australia, both natural and human (ACHASSK066)

Elaborations
  • using geographical tools (for example, a globe, wall map or digital application such as Google Earth) to locate and name significant places such as the states, territories, major cities and regional centres in Australia
  • identifying and describing the major natural features of Australia (for example, rivers, deserts, rainforests, the Great Dividing Range, the Great Barrier Reef and islands of the Torres Strait) and describing them with annotations on a map
  • comparing the boundaries of Aboriginal Countries with the surveyed boundaries between Australian states and territories to gain an appreciation about the different ways Australia can be represented
  • describing how the territory of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples contains the Country/Places of many individuals and language groups
  • exploring how oral traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples were used to map landscapes
General capabilities
  • Numeracy Numeracy
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Cultural identity,  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,  Australian languages

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Sharing stories: culture

This is a rich resource about the many intertwined aspects of Aboriginal cultures, including law, Country and Dreaming. It consists of an introduction, a teacher guide, three films made by Aboriginal students ('The Ngatji and paddle steamer', 'Bilwal medicine' and 'Thunderman') and two video interviews, one with Jarlmadangah ...

Teacher resource

GeogSpace: year 3 - exemplar

This is a web page consisting of an overview and two illustrations of practice on the GeogSpace website, a resource for teachers. The illustrations develop the concept of place into a more complex idea with subtleties of function, and contrasts in settlements between different places. Illustration 1 develops students' knowledge ...

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Sharing stories: community

This is a rich resource about the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' communities and identities. It consists of an introduction; a teacher guide; a film, 'My people, the Karajarri people', made by Wynston Shoveller about the Mowla Bluff massacre in the Kimberley region in 1916; and a video interview ...

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The world's largest living organism

The Great Barrier Reef is a collection of large coral reefs that stretch for more than 2,000 km along the Queensland coast. The Reef is home to a huge number of plants and animals, and it has many islands and coral cays. Watch nesting turtles and go underwater to see spectacular footage of reef creatures. Discover more ...

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How Uluru came to be

Uluru is found in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Australia's Red Centre. This region contains many landform features and is a place of special significance for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike. Find out about the Earth movements that created these incredible landforms and the creation stories of the area's ...

Teacher resource

Indigenous peoples: people, place, language and song

This is an interactive resource about Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their cultures. Learning activities explore how place, language and song relate to Indigenous Australian peoples. The resource is a unit of work using multimodal texts including music video clips, picture storybooks, songs ...

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When it rains in the desert

The desert in Australia's arid centre has a variable climate. When it rains, the landscape around Uluru is transformed. Watch this clip to see how desert plants and animals respond, such as the desert oaks that bloom and attract honeyeaters. The rains provide water and stimulate new growth, a signal for Red Kangaroos and ...

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The Daintree, where rainforest and reef meet

Queensland's Daintree National Park is one of the few remaining large areas of tropical rainforest in the world. Come tour the rainforest and see why it is part of a World Heritage area. Find out why it is thought to be one of the oldest rainforests on the planet. See some of the plants, reptiles, birds, insects and amphibian ...

Mobile app

Explorer for ArcGIS: mapping tool app

This is a rich interactive IOS and Android app resource that displays maps from a range of sources and provides tools to manipulate and interrogate the maps. The resource appears as a map with eight main functions: a Maps button providing access to a gallery of maps; an Overview button providing information about the current ...

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Landforms of the Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains is a region located west of Sydney. It is a place of varying landforms including deep canyons, tall waterfalls and sandstone structures such as the Three Sisters. Watch this clip to look deep into the canyons that have been carved through sandstone and rock, and shaped by wind and rain.

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Sharing stories: films by location

This is a map providing links to films about culture, ancestral beings, beliefs and country from eight Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander communities around Australia. The films are 'The story of Girbar' from the Thabu clan; 'Miiku and Tinta' from the Umpila people; 'Moon and the gecko' from the Paakantji people; 'Bunjil ...

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Flinders Ranges: desert fortress

In contrast to the surrounding desert, the mountains of the Flinders Ranges in South Australia have high rainfall with lush grasslands and forests. Early settlers were attracted to the good conditions found in this landscape but struggled during periods of drought. Find out about the diverse landscapes and variable climate ...

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A haven in the harsh desert heat

Watarrka National Park in central Australia is home to many plants and animals. Here, Kings Canyon, with its high sandstone walls, is a haven for rare and ancient plants. Temperatures soar in the desert but many different lizards thrive here. Venture deep into the Red Centre and discover why this is an important environment ...

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Kakadu history in rock art

Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory is transformed each year by the monsoonal rains, but how did ancient sea level changes alter the landscape? Thousands of Aboriginal rock art sites across Kakadu tell the stories of this ancient, sacred land. Visit some of them to discover more about this place and its people.

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Minibeasts in the forest treetops

The Daintree tropical rainforest in Far North Queensland is home to many different insects and spiders. Take a trip into the treetops to see some of the minibeasts that live there, such as Rhinoceros Beetles, Green Tree Ants and spiders.

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The dynamic Tanami Desert

In the Red Centre of Australia, the Tanami Desert is alive with wildlife, including rare native animals and feral pests. Local Aboriginal people are helping scientists to research the impact feral cats have on wildlife. Watch this clip to see incredible footage of the desert, its people and its animals.

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An island where warm waters meet cool

Lord Howe Island lies off the east coast of Australia where warm, tropical seas meet cool currents from the south. Here, a mix of fish suited to warmer waters live together with fish suited to the cooler southern waters. Lord Howe Island has many reasons to be protected, such as being home to the world's most southern coral ...

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Discover the Daintree's secrets

The Daintree in Tropical North Queensland is a place of high rainfall that feeds clear creeks that flow through the rainforest. Explore the Daintree's waterways by canoe and discover just some of the many plants and animals that live there. Rise above the lush, tree-top canopy in a giant crane to view this tropical rainforest ...

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At the peak of the Kakadu monsoon

The monsoonal rains of Kakadu are the lifeblood of the landscape, creating the floodplains and paperbark swamps that animals rely on for food and shelter. Kakadu National Park is a special place where a dramatic cycle of life and death is played out. Explore one of Australia's national treasures, Kakadu, at the peak of ...

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Why are they called the Blue Mountains?

The Blue Mountains are home to many different species of eucalypt trees. See how a bushfire in the Blue Mountains is part of the cycle of life. Bushfire changes the landscape but also stimulates new growth and regeneration of the forest. Watch this clip to see the eucalypt forest before and after a fire.