Humanities and social sciences / Year 4 / Knowledge and Understanding / Geography

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The importance of environments, including natural vegetation, to animals and people (ACHASSK088)

Elaborations
  • identifying the main types of vegetation, including forest, savannah, grassland, woodland and desert, and explaining the relationship between climate and natural vegetation
  • exploring how vegetation has an important role in sustaining the environment by producing oxygen, protecting food-producing land from erosion, retaining rainfall, providing habitat for animals, sheltering crops and livestock, providing shade for people, cooling urban places, producing medicines, wood and fibre, and making places appear more attractive
  • explaining how people‚Äôs connections with their environment can also be aesthetic, emotional and spiritual
  • explaining the significance of vegetation endemic in the local area to survival of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples (for example, as a source of food, shelter, medicine, tools and weapons)
  • exploring strategies to protect particular environments that provide the habitats for animals (for example, planting bird-attracting vegetation)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Attitudes,  Habitats,  Environmental stewardship,  Climate,  Conservation (Environment),  Sense of place

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How Uluru came to be

Uluru is found in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Australia's Red Centre. This region contains many landform features and is a place of special significance for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike. Find out about the Earth movements that created these incredible landforms and the creation stories of the area's ...

Interactive Resource

Wilderquest

This is a multi-faceted resource exploring six types of New South Wales environments – desert, alpine, woodlands, rainforest, coast and town – and their plants, animals and people. Intended for children in the lower and mid-primary years and their teachers, the major part of resource consists of four open access elements. ...

Teacher resource

Seasonal Cycles in Australia

This is a unit of work that focuses on seasonal cycles in Australia. Students explore how seasons vary based on location and how Indigenous cultures from different parts of Australia have systems and names for the seasons based on observation of the environment. Students also make comparisons with the concept of four seasons ...

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Key climate groups in Australia

This is a map of Australia showing the location of its six key climate groups: Equatorial, Tropical, Subtropical, Desert, Grasslands and Temperate. It was developed by the Bureau of Meteorology and there are links to a map of subdivisions within the key groups and to an information page about climate classification. The ...

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Farms and people’s connections to them: producer video

This is a video about the operation of the Outback Pride project and the value of the Australian native food produced in conjunction with Aboriginal peoples. To a visual background of the nursery at Reedy Creek in South Australia and some of 25 Aboriginal communities involved in the project in SA and Northern Territory, ...

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When it rains in the desert

The desert in Australia's arid centre has a variable climate. When it rains, the landscape around Uluru is transformed. Watch this clip to see how desert plants and animals respond, such as the desert oaks that bloom and attract honeyeaters. The rains provide water and stimulate new growth, a signal for Red Kangaroos and ...

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The Daintree, where rainforest and reef meet

Queensland's Daintree National Park is one of the few remaining large areas of tropical rainforest in the world. Come tour the rainforest and see why it is part of a World Heritage area. Find out why it is thought to be one of the oldest rainforests on the planet. See some of the plants, reptiles, birds, insects and amphibian ...

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The world's largest living organism

The Great Barrier Reef is a collection of large coral reefs that stretch for more than 2,000 km along the Queensland coast. The Reef is home to a huge number of plants and animals, and it has many islands and coral cays. Watch nesting turtles and go underwater to see spectacular footage of reef creatures. Discover more ...

Teacher resource

ARKive on tour

This is a scientific creative-writing activity for students that explores habitats, adaptation and threats to flora and fauna in particular locations throughout the world. The resource includes a PowerPoint presentation, teacher notes, an example of a travel article, a template for students to write a travel article, and ...

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Landforms of the Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains is a region located west of Sydney. It is a place of varying landforms including deep canyons, tall waterfalls and sandstone structures such as the Three Sisters. Watch this clip to look deep into the canyons that have been carved through sandstone and rock, and shaped by wind and rain.

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Connecting with Aboriginal desert art

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in the centre of Australia is a desert landscape where some highly adapted plants and animals live. Aboriginal peoples' knowledge of and close connection to the land and its wildlife is expressed through their artwork. See how an Aboriginal painting depicts the desert after rains.

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A precious heritage

This is an information page about the weather culture of Aboriginal peoples in central and northern Australia, and the direct and indirect observations they have made over thousands of years to identify indicators that predict the weather and the changing of the seasons. It points out that this knowledge ‘represents a precious ...

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Places we protect

This is a rich, multilayered resource about 35 protected Bush Heritage reserves throughout Australia. The resource includes a map of Australia that displays the locations of the 35 reserves. Each location is linked to important information and images including: quick facts; visiting information; the animals, plants and ...

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Discover the Daintree's secrets

The Daintree in Tropical North Queensland is a place of high rainfall that feeds clear creeks that flow through the rainforest. Explore the Daintree's waterways by canoe and discover just some of the many plants and animals that live there. Rise above the lush, tree-top canopy in a giant crane to view this tropical rainforest ...

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Kakadu history in rock art

Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory is transformed each year by the monsoonal rains, but how did ancient sea level changes alter the landscape? Thousands of Aboriginal rock art sites across Kakadu tell the stories of this ancient, sacred land. Visit some of them to discover more about this place and its people.

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A haven in the harsh desert heat

Watarrka National Park in central Australia is home to many plants and animals. Here, Kings Canyon, with its high sandstone walls, is a haven for rare and ancient plants. Temperatures soar in the desert but many different lizards thrive here. Venture deep into the Red Centre and discover why this is an important environment ...

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The dynamic Tanami Desert

In the Red Centre of Australia, the Tanami Desert is alive with wildlife, including rare native animals and feral pests. Local Aboriginal people are helping scientists to research the impact feral cats have on wildlife. Watch this clip to see incredible footage of the desert, its people and its animals.

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Flinders Ranges: desert fortress

In contrast to the surrounding desert, the mountains of the Flinders Ranges in South Australia have high rainfall with lush grasslands and forests. Early settlers were attracted to the good conditions found in this landscape but struggled during periods of drought. Find out about the diverse landscapes and variable climate ...

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Discovering past methods of food and fibre production: producer video

This is a video about the native food plants of the Mount Gambier region in South Australia and how they were used by the local Buandig Aboriginal people. It is introduced by ethnobotanist and author Neville Bonney who shows a wide range of local plants, often giving their names in Bungandidj language. The plants include ...

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Why are they called the Blue Mountains?

The Blue Mountains are home to many different species of eucalypt trees. See how a bushfire in the Blue Mountains is part of the cycle of life. Bushfire changes the landscape but also stimulates new growth and regeneration of the forest. Watch this clip to see the eucalypt forest before and after a fire.