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Civics and citizenship / Year 8 / Civics and Citizenship Skills / Questioning and research

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Develop a range of questions to investigate Australia's political and legal systems (ACHCS068)

Elaborations
  • developing complex and open-ended questions to explore a civics or citizenship topic such as ‘freedoms’ (for example, ‘What do our freedoms mean in practice?’ and ‘What do you consider to be the most important freedom?’)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
ScOT terms

Law,  Politics

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Video

Blood, sweat and stones: convict builders

Visit a working farm in Tasmania that uses buildings made by convict workers in the early 1800s. See the stones they carried and the tools they used. Find out how farm work has changed since colonial times. This clip is one in a series of four.

Video

African American salary disparity, 1968

How does it feel to be paid less than another person doing the same job, because of the colour of your skin? During the 1960s, this was the plight of many professional African Americans who were not paid equally for doing the same work as their white counterparts. Listen to David Dinkins, a New York lawyer, share his experiences.

Video

Defending civil rights: an activist's perspective

What happens when the members of a society feel like they have no hope? This is the situation faced by members of Harlem's African American community in 1968, who find themselves in a cycle of poverty. Civil rights activists like Al Cook offer a solution to the problem: fight back.

Video

Adoption of Indigenous Australian children

Imagine being taken away from your family and forced to live with people from another language, place and culture. This interview, recorded a week before the 1967 Referendum, captures an the perspective of Margaret Valadian, a prominent young Aboriginal Australian, on the practice of adoption and the removal of Aboriginal ...

Video

Charles Perkins fights for racial equality

Why is Charles Perkins remembered as a significant leader in the struggle for the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples? In this clip, he looks back on two campaigns that brought him to public attention in the 1960s and were part of a wider struggle to end racial discrimination in Australia. This clip ...

Video

Calls grow for Indigenous recognition in Australia

Discover why many Australians believe the time has come to change the Australian Constitution to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories. This program from January 2012 examines the debate about how this change might be achieved. It looks at the growing call for our constitution to recognise and advance ...

Video

Balancing opposing views on native title

The Mabo decision of 1992 created uncertainty for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as for the mining and pastoral industries. Public and 'leasehold' land was subject to native title claims. Listen to the responses of Indigenous leaders and the mining industry as the effects of the High Court decision ...

Video

Ronald Reagan: commemorating heroism

Few things reveal both the best and worst of humanity more than war. The D-Day landings of World War II were full of horror and heroism and are commemorated in this speech by former President of the United States of America, Ronald Reagan. Explore the construction of this speech and how it is shaped to suit audience and purpose.

Video

The British arrive in Tasmania

Learn why, in 1803, the British established a colony in Tasmania, at Hobart Town. Find out about the hardships faced by the convicts and early colonists and the early industries that helped some of them prosper. Find out about the effect that displacement had on the local palawa people.

Video

Placating Billy Hughes in the Treaty of Versailles

When Australian Prime Minister Billy Hughes joined World War I victors at the Palace of Versailles to determine the future of the post-war world, would he seek a lasting peace, or revenge and compensation for his country's losses? US President Woodrow Wilson, an idealist, wanted self-determination for the world's peoples, ...

Video

Being an Aboriginal student in the 1960s

Listen to Stan Grant Snr, Marcia Langton and Sol Bellear as they share their school experiences. How would you describe what they experienced? How do their memories make you feel? Why do you think these things happened to them? And what effect do you think their experiences would have had on them?

Video

Marcia Langton on racism

Marcia Langton, a teenager in 1967, reflects on her experiences of racism. What does she say about the language of racism? How have Marcia and Stan Snr experienced racism? And what does Marcia say are its effects? What do you think are the effects of racism?

Video

1967 and a new activism

How did the yes vote in 1967 change the way laws were made for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? The struggle for land rights became the focus of the next wave of Aboriginal activists, who gained domestic and world attention by erecting a tent embassy on the lawns of  Parliament House in Canberra. Why was the ...

Video

Whadjuk people displaced

Noongar Whadjuk [pronounced wod-JUK] Elder and ambassador Dr Noel Nannup speaks about the "tall ships" arriving in 1829 to establish the Swan River Colony, the cultural misunderstandings and resistance that occurred and the effects of colonisation on the traditional Aboriginal ways of life.

Video

History of voting

Australia's first parliamentary election was in 1843. What was different about voting then? When and how did that change to resemble elections we have now? See if you can list the three significant dates in Australia’s history of voting and the changes that occurred on those dates.

Video

Rations and coupon shopping

Discover what it was like to go shopping in Australia during World War II. See how people in the 1940s had to live with restrictions on how much they could buy (rationing). Find out how rationing was an attempt to make the distribution of necessary goods, such as food and clothing, equal for everybody.

Video

Taking action for gender equality

As newly appointed Ambassador for Women and Girls, Natasha Stott Despoja is expected to promote gender equality internationally, particularly in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean Rim regions. In this clip from the 7:30 Report, Natasha identifies some of the work that is already underway, while acknowledging some of the ...

Video

President Sukarno faces political unrest

How long can a president last in the top job when those in the government want him out? In this 1967 news clip, Indonesia's first president, Sukarno, is faced with political opposition. While he is still popular with the people, politicians speculate that he may not be in the job for long. Although Sukarno puts on a brave ...

Video

Australia's first Aboriginal member of parliament

Neville Bonner became Australia's first Aboriginal parliamentarian when he was appointed to represent Queensland in the Senate in 1971. In this clip, Senator Bonner outlines some of his priorities and his response to public expectations as he prepared to take office.

Video

Judgement and justification after the Iraq War

What are the consequences of human rights abuses in a time of war? In March 2003, the USA led a coalition of nations in a military campaign in Iraq. One of the main justifications for the war was the reported existence of weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) but as the war progressed and no WMDs were found, suspicion about ...