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Civics and citizenship / Year 8 / Civics and Citizenship Skills / Communication and reflection

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Reflect on their role as a citizen in Australia‚Äôs democracy (ACHCS074)

Elaborations
  • considering how personal experiences and circumstances influence their identity as a citizen and how they relate to others
  • considering the factors that shape the way they meet their responsibilities as a citizen (for example, where they live)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
ScOT terms

Citizenship,  Social role

Online

Exploring the Australian of the Year Awards

The inquiry unit provides a sequence of investigations that asks students to consider the history of the Australian of the Year Awards and the gallery of outstanding Australians that the Awards celebrate. Students use a variety of primary and secondary source materials to explore how Australia's changing perspectives on ...

Online

Giving it: resources for secondary schools

This series of resources explores the concept of philanthropy and considers why and how active citizens participate in communities. Student worksheets examine the concept of civic responsibility and explore the values underpinning the act of giving. Research activities encourage students to explore different community groups ...

Interactive

Be the change

This is an interactive about becoming an effective agent of change through civic action in a local community. Users learn a number of practical ways to take democratic action on issues. The context is an abandoned block of land located in an area with a range of issues, such as youth unemployment and environment concerns. ...

Video

African American salary disparity, 1968

How does it feel to be paid less than another person doing the same job, because of the colour of your skin? During the 1960s, this was the plight of many professional African Americans who were not paid equally for doing the same work as their white counterparts. Listen to David Dinkins, a New York lawyer, share his experiences.

Video

Defending civil rights: an activist's perspective

What happens when the members of a society feel like they have no hope? This is the situation faced by members of Harlem's African American community in 1968, who find themselves in a cycle of poverty. Civil rights activists like Al Cook offer a solution to the problem: fight back.

Video

Generational change for Italian migrants

What would it be like to start life in a new country without much knowledge of the language or culture? The clip shows the strength of the cultural traditions that Onsonato Galluzzo and his wife brought with them from Italy. See how the older family members maintain their Italian heritage and the younger generation adapt ...

Video

Charles Perkins fights for racial equality

Why is Charles Perkins remembered as a significant leader in the struggle for the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples? In this clip, he looks back on two campaigns that brought him to public attention in the 1960s and were part of a wider struggle to end racial discrimination in Australia. This clip ...

Video

Attaining equality

Explore the idea of pride in your forebears as famous entertainer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson reflects on being both African American and a citizen of the USA. In this 1960 'Spotlight' panel discussion, Robeson points out the difficulty and importance of gaining equality in a society that is based on conquest ...

Video

Ronald Reagan: commemorating heroism

Few things reveal both the best and worst of humanity more than war. The D-Day landings of World War II were full of horror and heroism and are commemorated in this speech by former President of the United States of America, Ronald Reagan. Explore the construction of this speech and how it is shaped to suit audience and purpose.

Video

The British arrive in Tasmania

Learn why, in 1803, the British established a colony in Tasmania, at Hobart Town. Find out about the hardships faced by the convicts and early colonists and the early industries that helped some of them prosper. Find out about the effect that displacement had on the local palawa people.

Video

The pros and cons of National Service

The National Service scheme was introduced to Australia in 1964 by the Menzies government. Young men whose birthdays were drawn in a ballot spent two years training in the 'Regular Army Supplement', then three years in the Regular Army Reserve on a part-time basis. National servicemen were likely to be sent to fight in ...

Video

Being an Aboriginal student in the 1960s

Listen to Stan Grant Snr, Marcia Langton and Sol Bellear as they share their school experiences. How would you describe what they experienced? How do their memories make you feel? Why do you think these things happened to them? And what effect do you think their experiences would have had on them?

Video

Marcia Langton on racism

Marcia Langton, a teenager in 1967, reflects on her experiences of racism. What does she say about the language of racism? How have Marcia and Stan Snr experienced racism? And what does Marcia say are its effects? What do you think are the effects of racism?

Video

1967 and a new activism

How did the yes vote in 1967 change the way laws were made for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? The struggle for land rights became the focus of the next wave of Aboriginal activists, who gained domestic and world attention by erecting a tent embassy on the lawns of  Parliament House in Canberra. Why was the ...

Video

Drugs may contain a 'biological calling card'

Illegal drug producers may leave behind DNA in the drugs they manufacture. This 'biological calling card' can then be used to locate and identify suspects. Find out how a South Australian scientist was able to extract DNA from a sample of drugs seized from a police drug-trafficking operation. Discover the new technique ...

Video

Germaine Greer and women's liberation, 1970

Discover what it was like for women who spoke up for equal rights in 1970. Germaine Greer's 'The Female Eunuch' was first published in that year. It would inspire many to challenge traditional views of female and male roles. Listen as, in 1970, Greer expresses her ideas and several Australian women and girls say what they ...

Video

Governor Arthur Phillip and the Eora

Governor Arthur Phillip was the first governor of New South Wales. His treatment of the indigenous Aboriginal people was initially friendly as he made efforts to get to know the Sydney Eora Aboriginal people. These early gestures though, were undermined by the displacement of Aboriginal people further inland to make room ...

Video

Whadjuk people displaced

Noongar Whadjuk [pronounced wod-JUK] Elder and ambassador Dr Noel Nannup speaks about the "tall ships" arriving in 1829 to establish the Swan River Colony, the cultural misunderstandings and resistance that occurred and the effects of colonisation on the traditional Aboriginal ways of life.

Video

Race riots after the death of Martin Luther King

Discover what the USA was trying to come to terms with in 1968 after the assassination of Martin Luther King. Destruction and killing in more than 100 cities is what followed the event. This Weekend Magazine special report features African American civil rights activist Floyd McKissick commenting on the riots and calling ...

Video

History of voting

Australia's first parliamentary election was in 1843. What was different about voting then? When and how did that change to resemble elections we have now? See if you can list the three significant dates in Australia’s history of voting and the changes that occurred on those dates.