Geography / Year 8 / Geographical Knowledge and Understanding / Unit 1: Landforms and landscapes

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features (ACHGK048)

Elaborations
  • identifying different types of landscapes (for example, coastal, riverine, arid, mountain and karst) and describing examples from around the world, including Antarctica
  • identifying some iconic landscapes in Australia and the world, and describing what makes them iconic
  • describing some of the different types of landforms within a landscape
  • exploring the names, meanings and significance of landform features from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander perspective
General capabilities
  • Numeracy Numeracy
ScOT terms

Landforms

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The world's largest living organism

The Great Barrier Reef is a collection of large coral reefs that stretch for more than 2,000 km along the Queensland coast. The Reef is home to a huge number of plants and animals, and it has many islands and coral cays. Watch nesting turtles and go underwater to see spectacular footage of reef creatures. Discover more ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Rainforest: read a brochure

Read a six-page brochure about the climate of a temperate rainforest in Victoria. Look at maps of Australia showing patterns of temperature and rainfall. Find out what clothing to bring and how to get to the rainforest from the airport. As you go, look up the meaning of tricky words.

Interactive Resource

Interactive maps

Interactive Maps is a discovery and exploration view of Geoscience Australia's geospatial services. Maps are organised under the following themes: Australian Marine Spatial Information System (AMSIS); Earth observation and satellite imagery, National location information; Geology and geophysics; Hazards; Marine and coastal; ...

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Tectonic plates move slowly with massive results

The Earth's tectonic plates move just a few millimetres every year. It may not sound like much, but over time it's enough to create some amazing landforms at the plate boundaries. Take a look at how scientists track this movement and find out where the biggest plate movements occur.

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Restoring coral reefs

This is a video resource describing efforts by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to restore coral reefs damaged by pollution, disease, climate change and ship groundings in the Caribbean and Florida Keys. The video explains that the natural building blocks of reefs in these areas are staghorn and ...

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An island where warm waters meet cool

Lord Howe Island lies off the east coast of Australia where warm, tropical seas meet cool currents from the south. Here, a mix of fish suited to warmer waters live together with fish suited to the cooler southern waters. Lord Howe Island has many reasons to be protected, such as being home to the world's most southern coral ...

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At the peak of the Kakadu monsoon

The monsoonal rains of Kakadu are the lifeblood of the landscape, creating the floodplains and paperbark swamps that animals rely on for food and shelter. Kakadu National Park is a special place where a dramatic cycle of life and death is played out. Explore one of Australia's national treasures, Kakadu, at the peak of ...

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Landforms from space

This is an online resource containing satellite images of nine distinctive landforms across Australia. The images, taken from the Landsat satellite series, are of the landforms: Roper River, NT; Lake Eyre, SA; Gulf Country, Qld; Channel Country, Qld; Cairns, Qld; Liverpool Plains, NSW; Snowy Mountains, NSW; Gippsland, Vic; ...

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Spectacular landforms shaped by erosion

Take a trip around the English coastline. In each location, the erosive power of the wind and the waves is obvious. But it's differences in the underlying geology that account for the diverse range of landforms that you are about to see.

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Wild backyards: digital stories

This an online series of three short digital stories produced by the Queensland Museum entitled 'Wild backyards' in which experts explain how they made backyards more attractive to native wildlife. Links to Brisbane, Roma and Innisfail provide information on three different types of backyard. Each digital story includes ...

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Protecting coral reefs

This is a video resource describing mapping work being carried out by the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) to help conserve coral reef ecosystems, which are very vulnerable to changes in the marine environment. The video shows the team carrying out an underwater survey of fish and habitat in Buck Island Reef ...

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Can coral reefs survive?

Coral reefs are one of the world's most diverse ecosystems and they're often called the 'rainforests of the oceans'. Find out where the world's coral reefs are concentrated and why they are so important for marine life, the coastal environment and people. Also discover some of the threats to coral reefs around the world.

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Come and visit Antarctica!

Ever wondered what it's like in Antarctica? Watch this clip to find out! Join reporter Karen Barlow aboard the Aurora Australis, Australia's Antarctic research and resupply ship. What does she say is the difference between an iceberg and an iceflow? What do the horizontal lines in icebergs tell us? Why not do some research ...

Teacher resource

GeogSpace: years 7-8 - inquiry and skills

This is a web page consisting of an overview and two illustrations of practice on the GeogSpace website, a resource for teachers. The illustrations relate to the Geographical inquiry and Skills and the Geographical Knowledge and Understanding strands of the Australian Curriculum: Geography. In Illustration 1, year 7 students ...

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Ocean deep, mountain high

Ocean trenches are the deepest parts of the ocean. See why their location is a clue to how they were formed. How have mountain chains like the Alps and Himalayas been created? Find the answers to these questions by taking a closer look at what's happening at the world's convergent plate boundaries.

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Welcome to Wollemi National Park

Wollemi National Park is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. The traditional owners are the Wiradjuri people. This clip will take you on a guided tour of Dunns Swamp, in the north-west section of the park. The spectacular ancient landscape draws thousands of tourists each year but if you know where to ...

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Why are coral reefs important?

Coral reefs contain a high biodiversity of marine life and they're vital natural assets for coastal communities and cultures. In this clip you will hear from a panel of scientific and community experts as they discuss the importance of coral reefs to billions of people around the world. Discover some perspectives on the ...

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Trek into Cradle Mountain and Lake St Clair

Tasmania's Cradle Mountain and Lake St Clair are part of the Tasmanian World Heritage area. Come and see jagged peaks and pristine lakes that were formed thousands of years ago during the last ice age. Find out why the Aboriginal people of this area, the Larmairremener, called Australia's deepest lake 'Leeawuleena'.

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Lake Eyre bursts into life

Watch and be amazed at how Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre is transformed from a dry salt pan to a vast lake bursting with life. Find out what attracts thousands of pelicans to this region from thousands of kilometres away.

Teacher resource

GeogSpace: year 8 - exemplar

This is a web page consisting of an overview and four illustrations of practice on the GeogSpace website, a resource for teachers. The illustrations relate to the Geographical Knowledge and Understanding, and the Geographical Inquiry and Skills strands of the Australian Curriculum: Geography. The four illustrations investigate ...