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German / Year 9 and 10 / Understanding / Language variation and change

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Identify and analyse linguistic features of German that vary according to audience, context and purpose in familiar modelled spoken and written texts

[Key concepts: variation, register, style; Key processes: analysing, comparing, explaining]

 (ACLGEU032)

Elaborations
  • understanding that the level of formality in a text may be decreased by using some contractions and slang, for example, in an informal conversation or email, or increased by applying key features such as appropriate layout and structure, formal register and subordinate clauses, for example, in a job application letter
  • analysing differences in register and style when using language in different contexts, for example, watching video clips showing introductions, greetings and farewells in different situations, or noticing the use of youth language in songs, graffiti and text messages
  • interpreting, explaining and using textual conventions popular with young German speakers, such as the use of contractions, abbreviations and acronyms in text messages, for example, 4u = für dich = for you, brb = bin gleich wieder da = be right back, 8ung = Achtung!, dubido = du bist doof, sz = schreib zurück, sTn = schöner Tag noch
  • identifying key differences in regional dialects and accents
  • analysing linguistic choices in situations of potential conflict involving an apology and acceptance of an apology (complaining about poor service or faulty goods, or apologising for forgetting someone’s birthday), or dealing with a contentious issue and expressing agreement and disagreement in different ways, for example, Ich bin nicht damit einverstanden;. Das stimmt nicht ganz.; Spinnst du?
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • ICT capability Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability
ScOT terms

Register (Language),  German language

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