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German / Foundation to Year 2 / Understanding / Systems of language

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Recognise and reproduce the sounds and rhythms of spoken German, including distinctive sounds

[Key concepts: pronunciation, intonation; Key processes: listening, imitating, recognising]

 (ACLGEU114)

Elaborations
  • building phonic awareness by recognising and experimenting with sounds and rhythms, focusing on those that are novel and initially difficult such as ch (ich or acht), u (du), r (rot) and z (zehn)
  • developing pronunciation, phrasing and intonation skills by singing, reciting and repeating words and phrases in context
  • developing familiarity with the German alphabet and sound–letter correspondence through singing das Alphabetlied, identifying and naming letters, tracing words, and playing alphabet and spelling games such as Ich sehe was, was du nicht siehst using initial sounds or Galgenmännchen
  • understanding that although German and English use the same alphabet there are additional symbols in German: the Umlaut to alter the pronunciation of particular vowels (ä, ö, ü) and the Eszett (β)
  • noticing that all nouns are capitalised in German
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Pronunciation,  Intonation,  German language

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