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German / Foundation to Year 2 / Understanding / Language variation and change

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Recognise that in German, as in English and other languages, there are different ways of greeting and interacting with people

[Key concepts: register, language conventions, social practice; Key processes: noticing, comparing]

 (ACLGEU117)

Elaborations
  • recognising different forms of address and greeting, depending on time of day and the gender and social status of participants, for example, first names with peers (Tag, Luke!) and Guten Morgen, Frau Stein! for the teacher
  • recognising that there can be different forms of address for the same person, for example, Mama, Mutti, Mami, Mutter
  • understanding that the level of detail required can vary depending on the context, for example, Ich bin 5; Ich bin 6 Jahre und 3 Monate alt; Ich bin fast 7.
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Language conventions,  Greetings,  German language

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