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German / Foundation to Year 2 / Understanding / Language variation and change

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Recognise that Australia has speakers of many different languages, including German, and that German and English borrow words and expressions from each other

[Key concepts: multilingualism, culture, community; Key processes: observing, exploring, recognising]

 (ACLGEU118)

Elaborations
  • exploring the range of languages spoken in Australia, including Aboriginal languages and Torres Strait Islander languages, Asian languages and world languages
  • exploring the different languages used by their family or peers, for example, by creating a language map with greetings in each language represented in the class
  • recognising that German is an important world language spoken in many countries in the world apart from Germany, including Australia
  • recognising that English and other languages have borrowed German words, for example, Hamburger, Kindergarten and Glockenspiel, and that many words are shared across languages, for example, ‘computer’, ‘bus’, ‘taxi’ and ‘auto’
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Loanwords,  Language evolution,  Multilingualism,  German language

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