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German / Year 3 and 4 / Understanding / Language variation and change

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Recognise that German and English are related languages and that German is an important European and global language

[Key concepts: global language, culture, identity; Key processes: identifying, exploring, researching]

 (ACLGEU135)

Elaborations
  • exploring some similarities between Germanic languages, such as Dutch, English and German cognates
  • recognising that German is an official language of the ‘DACHL’ countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein) as well as in Belgium, Luxembourg and South Tyrol
  • finding examples of German used at home or in the community and creating a class collection or display, for example, products, labels or words used in English language advertisements, shop signs, recipe books or menus
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Language evolution,  Global language,  German language

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