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German / Year 7 and 8 / Understanding / Language variation and change

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Identify features of German that vary according to audience, context and purpose in familiar spoken and written texts

[Key concepts: register, variation; Key processes: identifying, comparing, analysing]

 (ACLGEU168)

Elaborations
  • identifying differences in register and style when using language in different contexts, for example, language in songs and graffiti, and teacher feedback on a test or in a formal school report
  • comparing German and English language use in similar situations and in texts with similar content such as advertisements, or student blogs about school issues
  • understanding particular functions of speech such as making a request or expressing pleasure or dissatisfaction, and considering how it is realised with different speakers (strangers, acquaintances, friends, family members), and possible consequences, including compliance, giving offence or being accepted into a group
  • recognising that different situations require different levels of politeness depending on the context and speaker, such as thanking a host parent or a peer for a gift or apologising to a teacher or a family member for being late
  • understanding that texts have different purposes (to persuade, to entertain), different audiences (children, adolescents, German speakers, Australians) and different forms (short speech, blog)
  • recognising textual conventions popular with young German speakers, such as the use of contractions, abbreviations and acronyms in text messages, for example, 4u = für dich = for you, brb = bin gleich wieder da = be right back, 8ung = Achtung!, dubido = du bist doof, sz = schreib zurück, sTn = schöner Tag noch
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • ICT capability Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability
ScOT terms

Language usage,  German language

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