Mathematics / Year 5 / Number and Algebra / Patterns and algebra

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Describe, continue and create patterns with fractions, decimals and whole numbers resulting from addition and subtraction (ACMNA107)

Elaborations
  • using the number line or diagrams to create patterns involving fractions or decimals
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Arithmetic sequences

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Year level 5-6
Resource type
Learning area Mathematics
Interactive Resource

Sites2See: Patterns and Algebra

Selected links to a range of interactive online resources for the study of patterns and algebra in Foundation to Year 6 Mathematics.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Circus towers: square stacks

Work out how many acrobats are needed to form square-shaped human towers. Start by building a square tower with four acrobats: two acrobats in the base layer and two acrobats standing on their shoulders. Examine a table and graph of the total number of acrobats in the towers. Predict the number of acrobats needed to build ...

Interactive resource

Bridge builder: triangles 1

Build bridges by adding triangular sections. Each section is made up of three beams. Make bridges in order of increasing widths (increasing by one section each time). Examine a table and graph of the total number of beams used in bridges of different sizes. Predict the number of beams needed to build a wider span. Describe ...

Interactive resource

Bridge builder: quadrilaterals

Build bridges by adding quadrilateral sections (each made up of four beams). Examine a table and graph of the total number of beams used in bridges of different sizes. Predict the number of beams needed to build bridges with wider spans. Describe the number pattern. This learning object is the third in a series of five ...

Interactive resource

Bridge builder: triangles 2

Build bridges by adding triangular sections (each made up of three beams). Make bridges in order of increasing widths (increasing by at least one section each time). Examine a table and graph of the total number of beams used in bridges of different sizes. Predict the number of beams needed to build a wider span. Describe ...

Interactive resource

Hopper: tenths

Help a frog to jump along a number line. Estimate the finishing point on a number line, after adding or subtracting multiples of tenths to a starting number. For example, 29.5+(12 x 0.2) = 31.9. Explore the patterns made on a counting grid and number line. Identify counting rules that match the pattern of 'landing spots' ...

Interactive resource

Circus towers: rectangular prisms

Work out how many acrobats are needed to form towers in the shape of rectangular prisms. Start by building a prism with twelve acrobats: six acrobats in the base layer and six acrobats standing on their shoulders. Examine a table and graph of the total number of acrobats in the towers. Predict the number of acrobats needed ...

Interactive resource

Circus towers: triangular prisms

Work out how many acrobats are needed to form prism-shaped human towers. Start by building a triangular prism with six acrobats: three acrobats in the base layer and three acrobats standing on their shoulders. Examine a table and graph of the total number of acrobats in the towers. Predict the number of acrobats needed ...

Teacher resource

reSolve: Real World Algebra: Chicken Box Patterns

This series of lessons explores number patterns and their rules, exploring pre-algebra ideas in a real-world setting. Students investigate how the geometric construction of chicken boxes (with toothpicks and chickpeas) is reflected in number patterns. The unit provides opportunities to expand to the more algebraic idea ...

Moving Image

Phi challenge

The golden ratio, Phi: fact or fallacy? What about the Fibonacci sequence? We are told this ratio and its cousin Fibonacci occur everywhere in nature. Let's see which of these claims stacks up when put to the test.

Interactive resource

Swamp survival: hundredths patterns

Help the boy cross the dangerous swamp by making a path of stepping stones. Place the decimals in an ascending order, skip-counting by tenths or hundredths to form the path. Compare the decimal fraction on each stepping stone to the others to see if it is larger or smaller. Look for a skip-counting pattern. Put the decimals ...

Interactive resource

Swamp survival: thousandths counting

Help the boy cross the dangerous swamp by making a path of stepping stones. Place the decimals in an ascending order, counting by thousandths to form the path. Compare the decimal fraction on each stepping-stone to the others to see if it is larger or smaller. Look for a counting pattern. Put the decimals in order from ...

Interactive resource

Swamp survival: thousandths patterns

Help the boy cross the dangerous swamp by making a path of stepping stones. Place the decimals in an ascending order, skip-counting by hundredths and thousandths to form the path. Compare the decimal fraction on each stepping stone to the others to see if it is larger or smaller. Look for a skip-counting pattern. Put the ...

Teacher resource

Top drawer teachers: fractions

This is a web page that comprehensively covers the teaching of the conceptual understanding of fractions through links to six sections. The first section covers the ‘Big ideas’ behind fractions, while the second section uses research findings to identify some common misunderstandings when learning fractions. The third explores ...

Interactive resource

Exploring number patterns

Find an addition or subtraction pattern relating to four numbers on a grid. Predict the next three numbers in the pattern. For example, predict the next three numbers in the following sequence: 60, 53, 46, 39...

Interactive resource

Musical number patterns: the challenge

Make music by building up rhythms from two instruments. Make a counting rule that includes a given number. Select the start number and then select a number to count by. For example, include the number 9 in a counting pattern by starting at 1, then count by 4. Describe another counting pattern that includes the same number. ...