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Mathematics / Year 1 / Statistics and Probability / Chance

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Identify outcomes of familiar events involving chance and describe them using everyday language such as ‘will happen’, ‘won’t happen’ or ‘might happen’ (ACMSP024)

Elaborations
  • justifying that some events are certain or impossible
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Likelihood

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Interactive

The slushy sludger: questions

Use a vending machine to squirt coloured 'slushies' into ice-cream cones. Work out which 'sludge events' are possible and then choose a matching probability word.

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Birthday probability

What is the probability there are at least two people in your class who have the same birthday? If you have at least 23 people in your class, the chances are good. Find out the maths behind this theory.

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What are the chances?

Do you know what chance is? It's the probability or the likelihood of something happening. Watch this video as Grace explains the probability of picking a red marble out of a bowl. What's the probability of picking a green marble?

Video

The giraffe ate it

When something has no chance of happening we say its impossible. Sometimes the chance of something happening is unlikely. Listen to these excuses explaining why the host did not do his homework. Which of his excuses might the teacher think, the chance of this happening is ... 'possible'?

Interactive

The foul food maker: go figure

This tutorial is suitable for use with a screen reader. It explains how the use of simple words can describe the likelihood of everyday events. How likely is an event: certain, likely, equal chance, unlikely or certainly not? Answer some questions using these words and then build your own examples. Learn how to describe ...

Interactive

The vile vendor: questions

Use a vending machine to get a vile-flavoured drink such as cabbage, smelly sock or rusty nail. The machine serves a can of drink randomly from four slots. Work out the likelihood of getting each flavour. Then choose a matching probability word: impossible, unlikely, equal, likely or certain. Move on to filling the slots ...

Interactive

Mystery spinner: challenge

Look at results in a frequency graph compiled after testing an unseen spinner. Work out the likely proportions of colours in the mystery spinner. Use a tool to build a new spinner (a dial with a pointer). Choose up to five equal-sized sectors. Fill the sectors with up to five colours. For example, make a five-part spinner ...

Interactive

The vile vendor: go figure

This tutorial is suitable for use with a screen reader. It explains how the use of simple words can describe the likelihood of everyday events. How likely is an event: certain, likely, equal chance, unlikely or certainly not? Answer some sample questions using these words and then build your own examples. This learning ...

Image

Sextant - Troughton, c1820

This is a brass pillar-frame sextant with inset silver/platinum scale, made by Troughton of London, circa 1820, with serial number 940. The sextant is housed in a fitted wooden box and has two interchangeable eyepieces and two sets of coloured filters. It is graduated to 145 degrees. Its arm has a silver vernier and a microscope. ...

Interactive

Fraction fiddle: matching cake fractions

Fill orders in a cake shop. Match a fraction to parts of a cake. For example, identify the fraction of a cake remaining after it has had one quarter removed. Check your prediction by making the fraction and seeing what it looks like as part of a circle. Watch the circle change as you adjust the numerals in the numerator ...

Interactive

Number trains

Arrange train carriages according to numbers on their sides. The numbers are represented in a range of formats such as words, numerals, dice dots or counting frames. Identify the numbers that come before and after starting numbers. Begin with numbers up to ten. Move on to work with larger numbers such as 40 and 50. Practise ...