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Mathematics / Year 5 / Statistics and Probability / Data representation and interpretation

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Pose questions and collect categorical or numerical data by observation or survey (ACMSP118)

Elaborations
  • posing questions about insect diversity in the playground, collecting data by taping a one-metre-square piece of paper to the playground and observing the type and number of insects on it over time
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Research questions,  Observations (Data),  Questionnaires,  Surveying (Data collection)

Online

Home energy use

Reducing carbon dioxide emissions and sustainable energy use and are two of the major issues facing the world today. This project explores energy use in homes, and compares individual energy use with the class average and calculate and graph CO2 emissions.

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Severe erosion in the Upper Murray River

Farmers along Victoria's Upper Murray claim that soil erosion on their properties is being caused by water released from the Snowy Mountains Scheme, a hydro-electricity project located in the Southern Alps. This clip from 2013 investigates the degradation occurring in an area where prime agricultural land is valued at 10,000 ...

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Radio pirates

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Why locals love living in Kenilworth

Kenilworth is a small town in rural Queensland with a close-knit community that takes great pride in their town's history and connectedness. In this clip you will hear long-standing locals, as well as a newcomer, describe the relaxed lifestyle, local businesses, attractions and history of Kenilworth.

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Food shortage: Please, Sir, can I have some more?

Are we headed for food shortages in the future? Many scientists say that food production is becoming a critical issue and that Australia has a part to play in securing food for the world's future. As you watch this clip from 2013, find out how past strategies dealt with the food security issue, and learn about our plans ...

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Steam or just a load of hot air?

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Public reactions to sending troops to Vietnam War

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John le Carré: the Berlin Wall

Imagine the impact of a wall built to divide a city in two: on one side communist East Berlin, on the other the democratic West. Acclaimed spy writer John le Carré witnessed the construction of the Berlin Wall, an icon of the Cold War. Listen to his recollections of this extraordinary event in modern history.

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Plants in our daily lives

Can you imagine a world without plants? Do you agree that plants are important to our lives? Listen to Nick explain the amazing variety of ways you use plants every day, often without knowing it.

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Scientists in Antarctica

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Forensics track drugs back to their origin

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Snapshots of top Australian scientists

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Re-creation of Shackleton's Antarctic survival

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Audio

Writing a scientist's journal

Imagine you are a scientist who discovered a prehistoric animal in one of Australia's harshest environments. This is what happened to Dr Nick Murphy, an evolutionary biologist from La Trobe University. He was very excited to discover several new species of crustaceans living in desert springs near Lake Eyre. Learn about ...

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The end of Japan's isolation

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Puzzling migration of eels and monarch butterflies

Scientists have many questions about the migratory habits of eels and monarch butterflies, and new research uncovers some of the secrets. Watch this clip to discover how satellite technology is helping to track eels. You'll also find out what organs are involved in helping monarch butterflies find their way. You will be ...

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Could you make a unicorn by crossing DNA?

Good question! Find out whether this is possible by watching as biologist at MIT, Dr Sera Thornton explains. What is a genome? And why do genomes need to be decoded? If the rhino genome was successfully decoded and the part that described the rhino horn was isolated, what would the process be for creating a unicorn?

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Greece honours Australian war veterans

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Germaine Greer on rock culture

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Stories set in stone: Sydney's Quarantine Station

Imagine arriving in Australia after months at sea only to be confined, perhaps for months, in a small area beside the sea. This story explores the experiences of people in the 19th or early 20th century who arrived in Sydney on ships on which serious diseases had broken out. Examine the records that some of these people ...