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History / Year 7 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding / Overview of the ancient world

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) (ACOKFH003)

Elaborations
  • exploring why the shift from hunting and foraging to cultivation (and the domestication of animals) led to the development of permanent settlements
  • identifying the major civilisations of the ancient world (namely Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Greece, Rome, India, China and the Maya); where and when they existed, and the evidence for contact between them
  • locating the major civilisations of the ancient world on a world map and using a timeline to identify the longevity of each ancient civilisation
  • identifying the major religions/philosophies that emerged by the end of the period (Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Islam) and their key beliefs (through group work)
General capabilities
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
ScOT terms

Agriculture,  Law,  Ancient history,  Religion,  Economy,  Socioeconomic status

Video

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The role of the Nile in Ancient Egypt

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Drones and bugs

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Growing avocados

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