Health and physical education / Year 9 and 10 / Movement and Physical Activity / Moving our body

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Provide and apply feedback to develop and refine specialised movement skills in a range of challenging movement situations (ACPMP099)

Elaborations
  • adapting and responding to changes in equipment that increase the complexity of a movement task or performance
  • transferring skills learnt in one movement situation to a different situation
  • performing specialised movement skills in situations where the rules or conditions have been modified to vary complexity
  • using knowledge of results feedback to support another student in performing a skill with greater accuracy or control
  • responding to teacher and peer feedback to enhance performance
  • using ICT to record others performance, and providing feedback on synchronicity and timing of movements in relation to other people, objects or external stimuli
  • providing constructive feedback on their own and others performance by using movement-analysis software to break down a skill or sequence
General capabilities
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Recreation,  Outdoor education,  Adventure games,  Resilience,  Fundamental movement skills,  Sports

Online

Tackling disability discrimination in sport

This is a unit of work about disability discrimination in sport. It explores: the concept of disability rights and how to make sports more inclusive; the barriers people with disabilities face when participating in some sports; the role of the Australian Human Rights Commission in disability complaints in sport; participation ...

Video

Cold War games,1999

'Cold War games' is an excerpt from the documentary 'Lies, Spies and Olympics', produced in 1999. 'Lies, Spies and Olympics' studies the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games, which have become etched in Australian mythology as a watershed in the nation's sporting, cultural and civic history. But behind the myth is a far more revealing ...

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Yulunga: kangaroo

Imitation activities were a favourite and popular activity for children everywhere. In one activity children would copy the actions of the kangaroo. This is a jumping relay race based on the actions of a kangaroo jumping. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a ...

Online

Yulunga: inkanyi

Although not a universal activity, athletic events were common. In a part of central Australia the children would have running races together. The race was a cooperative effort. According to age, running speed and fitness levels, runners started at different distances and all players attempted to finish together. This activity ...

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Yulunga: wirrwuyu

As in various other cultures, stone skipping (throwing) along a surface of water was played by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. On Dunk Island in Queensland, the throwing of cuttle-fish (krooghar) bones was observed. The bones were thrown along the surface of the water like ‘skipping stones’ and ...

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Yulunga: yiri

A spear game was recorded being played by the boys at Ulladulla in New South Wales. Small spears were thrown at pieces of wood, which were placed into running water. On Dunk Island in Queensland the boys used wood chips and pieces of bark floating on the water, or threw at small fish. This is a throwing-practice game played ...

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Yulunga: puldjungi

In one area of Victoria the ball game of puldjungi was played. Two sides (nangkera) were chosen and a ball was kicked up between them by a non-player. When it was caught by a player of one side they attempted to throw it to one of their own team. The ball was thrown from the shoulder and caught with one hand — if both hands ...

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Yulunga: pulyugge

Keep-away types of ball games were played in many parts of Australia. Pulyugge was played between selected teams of different groups in the Murray, Lake Alexandria and Lake Albert areas of South Australia. A running, passing and ball-catching game of team keep-away. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

Online

Yulunga: meetcha boma

A hockey game was played by the Noongar people in the south of Western Australia. The game was called meetcha boma (‘nut striking’) in the Perth area. A meeja or meetcha (red gum nut) was used as the ball and a piece of wood with a crooked root (bandeegurt) as the hockey stick. The stick was generally bent into shape with ...

Online

Yulunga: pucho-pucho tau-i-malle

This stone rolling and stopping game was originally described as ‘stick-and-stone’ and was played by men in the Boulia district of Queensland. The Pitta-Pitta people referred to it as pucho-pucho tau-i-malle. This is a ball rolling and stopping activity involving two groups of players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

Online

Yulunga: tok

A ‘secret’ play-language game was reported on Waiben (Thursday) Island in the early 1970s. It was spoken by girls in Torres Strait Creole and was introduced to Dauan Island, where it was spoken in the local language. The language was spoken fluently in unprepared talk. This is a play-language game in which players insert ...

Online

Yulunga: thurnda-gu

Rollers (toy cars) are to be found in many Aboriginal settlements in more remote parts of Australia. For example, toy trucks are made of wheel rims and toy cars from wire or twine attached to large tins filled with sand or damp soil. The tin-can rollers are pushed with handles made of wire or pulled using wire or twine. ...

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Yulunga: kungirruna

Various types of running and stepping games were played in many parts of Australia. This is a running and stepping activity in which players step on (or over) markers. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture ...

Online

Yulunga: emu

This game is based on a chasing game observed being played by Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory in more recent times. This is a chasing and catching (tag) game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous ...

Online

Yulunga: puloga

Regular mock combat tournaments took place in the Cardwell and Tully River areas of north Queensland. The Mallanpara people called this a prun. It was essentially an entertainment activity, though the opportunity was taken to settle disputes, real or imaginary. It also gave the men a chance to show off their prowess and ...

Online

Yulunga: kwatye

Water games and contests were played in all areas of Australia. In some parts of central Australia a frequent expression of ‘opposition’ between the generation groupings in a camp takes the form of light-hearted abuse and spectacular waterthrowing battles. The aim of the activity was to saturate certain kin in the opposite ...

Online

Yulunga: marutchi

Marutchi or black swan was a water game played by the Jagara (or Jagera) people in the Brisbane area. It was often played among inhabitants from different areas. Some of the players were very clever and could avoid being caught. If a player became tired he or she could be replaced by another player. Spectators were not ...

Online

Yulunga: ngarinbarm

The swimming game of ngarinbarm (turtle) was played by the Jagara (Jagera) people in lagoons around the Brisbane area. Players in a canoe chase and attempt to catch a ngarinbarm. The players who are the turtles swim underwater to avoid capture. The players in the canoe may enter the water to touch the turtles if they are ...

Online

Yulunga: pulukwanti

The Aboriginal people played a variety of water games and a common activity was to dive into the water. These are activities associated with diving into the water. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture ...

Image

Harbour swimming, Manly, 1960

This is a colour photograph depicting young children diving off a special apparatus at Manly Beach. The photograph was taken by Bill Brindle, who worked for the Australian News and Information Bureau. It is part of an online showcase called 'Summers Past'. Information about this particular item can be located in its educational ...