Close message Scootle has scheduled maintenance from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm on 7 Oct 2021. You may experience intermittent connection at this time.

Health and physical education / Year 9 and 10 / Movement and Physical Activity / Understanding movement

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Examine the role physical activity, outdoor recreation and sport play in the lives of Australians and investigate how this has changed over time (ACPMP104)

Elaborations
  • participating in a range of physical activities from the Asia region, such as yoga, tai chi, martial arts and Asia-inspired dance and performance art, and exploring their importance as a social and cultural practice
  • researching the trends in participation in organised junior sports and predicting future trends and directions
  • investigating the varied perspectives held by Australians on sport and examining how this diversity is represented in the sports we play today
  • exploring the impact of media messages associated with physical activity, outdoor recreation and sport in Australia
  • analysing the significant contributions Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make, and have made, to sport in Australia
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Sporting culture,  Recreation,  Physical activity

Online

Tackling disability discrimination in sport

This is a unit of work about disability discrimination in sport. It explores: the concept of disability rights and how to make sports more inclusive; the barriers people with disabilities face when participating in some sports; the role of the Australian Human Rights Commission in disability complaints in sport; participation ...

Online

Yulunga: yiri

A spear game was recorded being played by the boys at Ulladulla in New South Wales. Small spears were thrown at pieces of wood, which were placed into running water. On Dunk Island in Queensland the boys used wood chips and pieces of bark floating on the water, or threw at small fish. This is a throwing-practice game played ...

Online

Yulunga: gugiyn nahri

The activities outlined are examples of how the games can be modified to be used in a tabloid event. Groups of four to six players over a two to three-minute time period are recommended. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

Online

Yulunga: meetcha boma

A hockey game was played by the Noongar people in the south of Western Australia. The game was called meetcha boma (‘nut striking’) in the Perth area. A meeja or meetcha (red gum nut) was used as the ball and a piece of wood with a crooked root (bandeegurt) as the hockey stick. The stick was generally bent into shape with ...

Online

Yulunga: pucho-pucho tau-i-malle

This stone rolling and stopping game was originally described as ‘stick-and-stone’ and was played by men in the Boulia district of Queensland. The Pitta-Pitta people referred to it as pucho-pucho tau-i-malle. This is a ball rolling and stopping activity involving two groups of players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

Online

Yulunga: inkanyi

Although not a universal activity, athletic events were common. In a part of central Australia the children would have running races together. The race was a cooperative effort. According to age, running speed and fitness levels, runners started at different distances and all players attempted to finish together. This activity ...

Online

Yulunga: tarnambai

Although not a universal activity, athletics-type events were common. On Tiwi (Bathurst) Island the children collected the seed heads of the ‘spring rolling grass’ (Spinifex hirsutis) that grew on the sand hills near the coast. These were taken to the beach and released. The children allowed these to be blown along by the ...

Online

Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

Online

Yulunga: kungirruna

Various types of running and stepping games were played in many parts of Australia. This is a running and stepping activity in which players step on (or over) markers. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture ...

Online

Yulunga: wirrwuyu

As in various other cultures, stone skipping (throwing) along a surface of water was played by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. On Dunk Island in Queensland, the throwing of cuttle-fish (krooghar) bones was observed. The bones were thrown along the surface of the water like ‘skipping stones’ and ...

Online

Australian children's participation in cultural and leisure activities - dataset

The dataset provides statistics about children's participation in cultural and leisure activities since 2003 to the latest year of available data in Australia. It is periodically updated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The dataset is in MS Excel format.

Online

Yulunga: kangaroo

Imitation activities were a favourite and popular activity for children everywhere. In one activity children would copy the actions of the kangaroo. This is a jumping relay race based on the actions of a kangaroo jumping. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a ...

Online

Yulunga: julba

Skipping with a vine was popular with the Jagara (or Jagera) people of Brisbane and surrounding areas. The game outlined below was based on a 1950s account by an elder named Gaiarbu. To play this skipping game successfully, the players needed to be very active and had to have plenty of practice. This is a skipping game ...

Online

Yulunga: emu

This game is based on a chasing game observed being played by Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory in more recent times. This is a chasing and catching (tag) game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous ...

Online

Yulunga: ngarinbarm

The swimming game of ngarinbarm (turtle) was played by the Jagara (Jagera) people in lagoons around the Brisbane area. Players in a canoe chase and attempt to catch a ngarinbarm. The players who are the turtles swim underwater to avoid capture. The players in the canoe may enter the water to touch the turtles if they are ...

Online

Yulunga: pulukwanti

The Aboriginal people played a variety of water games and a common activity was to dive into the water. These are activities associated with diving into the water. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture ...

Online

Yulunga: ilye

A boomerang game was played by the Wogadj people of central Australia. This was a keep-away type of game that encouraged a lot of running. A boomerang was thrown along the ground in the game. The older men usually played against the younger men. The game is one of running and throwing using a disc (frisbee) in place of ...

Online

Yulunga: millim baeyeetch

One of the favourite games of the Aboriginal people in parts of Victoria was a game of football. There were a few variations of the game and the one outlined here was observed in the 1840s. The ball was about the size of an orange, and was made of possum skin, with the fur side outwards. It was filled with pounded charcoal ...

Online

Yulunga: bari barlam bembinge

This is a suggested outline of a traditional games event. The games and activities outlined have been modified for use with co-educational classes and groups of different age and/or abilities, as a workshop or traditional games activity over a time period of one hour to one and a half hours. Groups of six to 12 may be used. ...

Online

Yulunga: riawena

Riawena means ‘fun (sport)’ in the language used by the Aboriginal people of the Oyster Bay area of Tasmania. A number of the games and activities can be conducted as athletic events. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...