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Science / Year 7 / Science as a Human Endeavour / Nature and development of science

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE119)

Elaborations
  • investigating how advances in telescopes and space probes have provided new evidence about space
  • researching different ideas used in the development of models of the solar system developed by scientists such as Copernicus, Khayyám and Galileo
  • researching developments in the understanding of astronomy, such as the predictions of eclipses and the calculation of the length of the solar year by Al‑Battani in the tenth century
ScOT terms

Evidence,  Paradigms,  Observations (Data)

Video

Tracking heatwaves in Australia

A database tracking the last 60 or so years of heatwaves shows that they are getting longer, more frequent and more intense in Australia. In this clip, climate scientist Dr Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick explains how and why. Overall, she describes that the biggest increase has been in the frequency of heatwaves in Australia, ...

Video

Rockets, Mars, Space Shuttles and Space Stations

<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Discover how space exploration has developed over the years. Find out about different space missions and experiments, and a range of spacecraft from the early probes to more complex shuttles. Where do you think space exploration might take us in the future?</span>

Video

Re-creation of Shackleton's Antarctic survival

In 1914 Ernest Shackleton and his crew set out on an expedition to cross Antarctica via the South Pole. But things went horribly wrong when their ship was crushed by ice on the way. In this news clip, witness an Australian scientist about to set out with five others to re-create Shackleton's remarkable journey of survival, ...

Video

Analysing carbon dioxide

Dr Paul Fraser has been part of the Greenhouse Gas team at the CSIRO for over 40 years. His team measures the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, by taking and analysing air samples from different locations around the world. Paul explains that there are a number of versions of carbon dioxide, made up of different isomers ...

Interactive

EnviroNorth: savanna walkabout

This is an interactive website about Australia's savannas. It has four main sections providing information about where tropical savannas are located across the world; the importance of termites in Australia's tropical savannas ecosystem; the lifecycle of the termite; and the research being conducted in Australia's savannas. ...

Interactive

Chicken farming in the living world: Stage 4

Chickens are fascinating animals and provide students with an interesting subject matter to discuss the many aspects of our living world. This interactive course for students explores the question 'What scientific knowledge has influenced the current agricultural practices of the chicken meat industry?' and comprises a ...

Video

The power of science photography

Visual art and science are often considered to be separate fields. Watch as Phred Petersen talks about the way he combines his passions of photography and science. What is the role of technology in enabling this crossover? What kinds of scientific discoveries can be assisted by high-speed photography? And how can scientific ...

Video

Snapshots of top Australian scientists

Australia has produced many of the world's top scientists. Watch this clip to discover who some of them are. Explore the scientific discoveries that made them famous, and how they changed our understanding of the world.

Video

Collecting and analysing climate data

The Bureau of Meteorology records temperatures daily at around 700 sites in Australia. There are also around 6000 sites that report rainfall information. Why is long term monitoring of weather important? What insights can this sort of data give scientists?

Video

How will fire change the climate?

Considering the impact of a changing climate on the severity and frequency of fires is one thing, but how about the impact of fires on climate? Why does Professor David Bowman describe this scenario as a 'fire spiral'? What are the consequences of a world with fewer forests? As Professor Craig Allen explains, drought and ...

Video

Anatomy of a raindrop

The water cycle is the circulation of water on, in and above Earth and it involves a number of stages and changes of state. This clip describes the water cycle and also how modern technology has contributed to our understanding of the shape of raindrops and its relationship to precipitation. Discover how raindrop shape ...

Video

Ramping it up, Egyptian pyramid style

How did the ancient Egyptians move and lift huge stones during construction of the pyramids? Secondary student Angus Atkinson designed an experiment to find out how the lives of pyramid workers could have been made easier. See how as you watch this video, which he entered in the 2013 Sleek Geeks Eureka Science Schools Prize.

Video

Best ever science facts

Do you have a favourite science fact? Listen as scientists from a range of fields describe their favourite facts of the scientific world. If you've ever wanted to know the length of a chameleon's tongue or what the most common cell in your body is, watch this clip.

Video

Is the supermoon really super?

Does the Moon ever appear bigger and brighter in the night sky? Find out as astronomer Tanya Hill from the Melbourne Planetarium explains why we sometimes see a 'supermoon'.

Video

The home of Australian science

Australia has a long and proud history of excellence in science. How should we celebrate this? Watch this clip to find out about an Australian organisation that recognises and promotes outstanding scientific achievement. You'll also find why its Canberra headquarters is referred to as 'the flying saucer'!

Video

Meteorites, asteroids, orbiting and gravity

Learn how Galileo Galilei's work overturned Aristotle's ideas about falling objects and led to an understanding that Earth revolves around the sun. Find out how Isaac Newton showed that the laws of motion on Earth and in space are the same, and that he discovered that the gravitational force of attraction between any two ...

Video

Climate clues hidden in polar ice

Did you know that samples of polar ice can tell us what the atmosphere was like almost a million years ago? The Bureau of Meteorology has records that go back 3000 years! Why do you think scientists are interested in learning what the atmosphere was like before industrialisation?

Video

Nordenskjöld, Antarctica and two long winters

Early in the 1900s, several long expeditions set out to delve into the mysteries of Antarctica. One of them made some remarkable scientific discoveries about life that existed long ago on the continent. But it wasn't all smooth sailing. This 1901-1903 Swedish expedition was plagued with problems. Watch this clip to find out more.

Interactive

Energy chains: energy use

Select energy sources and energy converters to build energy chains to power appliances and vehicles. Examine how each energy converter in a chain loses some energy and reduces the energy available for use. For example, show that using a solar panel and an electric motor to drive a car delivers only 16% of the original ...

Interactive

In digestion

Follow the passage of food through the human body. Select foods and drinks and decide how to digest them. For example, choose to chew, to add saliva to the mouth or add gastric juices to the stomach. Watch how the body reacts to changes. Find out more about digestion along the way and answer questions.