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Science / Year 10 / Science Understanding / Physical sciences

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The motion of objects can be described and predicted using the laws of physics (ACSSU229)

Elaborations
  • gathering data to analyse everyday motions produced by forces, such as measurements of distance and time, speed, force, mass and acceleration
  • recognising that a stationary object, or a moving object with constant motion, has balanced forces acting on it
  • using Newton’s Second Law to predict how a force affects the movement of an object
  • recognising and applying Newton’s Third Law to describe the effect of interactions between two objects
ScOT terms

Motion

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