Mathematics / Year 7 / Space

Curriculum content descriptions

describe transformations of a set of points using coordinates in the Cartesian plane, translations and reflections on an axis, and rotations about a given point (AC9M7SP03)

Elaborations
  • using digital tools to transform shapes in the Cartesian plane, describing and recording the transformations
  • describing patterns and investigating different ways to produce the same transformation, such as using \(2\) successive reflections to provide the same result as a translation
  • experimenting with, creating and re-creating patterns using combinations of translations, reflections and rotations, using digital tools
General capabilities
  • Numeracy Numeracy
ScOT terms

Transformation (Geometry)

Video

MathXplosion, Ep 34: Kite symmetry

Unfurl the secret of symmetry used in kites to make them fly! A kite in geometry looks a lot like a kite in the sky. We see that a kite is a special quadrilateral in which one of its two diagonals (long and short) is also its axis of symmetry, and if you fold the kite along that diagonal, the two halves will match up exactly ...

Interactive

Syllabus bites – speedy sliding

This is the first in a series of Syllabus bites related to transformations on the Cartesian plane aimed at Stage 4 Mathematics. Students find the coordinates of image points after translation. In doing so, they develop fluency in using coordinates and familiarity with the Cartesian plane, providing a basis for the investigations ...

Online

Transformation: Year 7 – planning tool

This planning resource for Year 7 is for the topic of Transformation. Students describe translations, reflections and rotations and identify line (mirror) and rotational symmetries. They will extend their understanding of transformations through exploring transformations on the Cartesian plane.

Online

Patterns, rules and graphs

In this lesson, students play games and learn about space and location, the Cartesian plane, pattern recognition and reductive reasoning by playing games and thinking. Students create algebraic equations to describe their strategy. Follow this lesson with Graphs: formulas and variables, though both lessons can be taught ...

Downloadable

How many in the queue?

Students use visualising and movement activities to develop an understanding of the relationship between variables.

Interactive

Syllabus bites – flipping and sliding

This is the third in a series of Syllabus bites related to transformations on the Cartesian plane. Students further their understanding of translation and reflection and explore relationships between these two transformations.

Online

Secondary mathematics: different representations

These seven learning activities, which focus on 'representations' using a variety of tools (software) and devices (hardware), illustrate the ways in which content, pedagogy and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. In the activities, teachers use different representations ...

Interactive

Syllabus bites – turbo turning

The fourth in a series of Syllabus bites related to transformations on the Cartesian plane. This Bite covers rotation of points.

Text

Transformations of the plane

This is a website designed for both teachers and students that introduces some transformations of the plane using coordinates in the Cartesian plane. In particular, transformations, translations, reflections in an axis and rotations of multiples of 90 degrees are discussed. Coordinates are used to describe these transformations. ...

Interactive

Syllabus bites – mixing it up

The fifth in a series of Syllabus bites related to transformations on the Cartesian plane. This bite covers combinations (composition) of transformations.

Interactive

Syllabus bites – frenzied flipping

This is the second in a series of Syllabus bites related to transformations on the Cartesian plane. This Bite covers reflection of points.

Video

MathXplosion, Ep 10: What is the strongest shape?

Are triangles really the strongest shapes ever? If so, why? Learn how and why right-angled and equilateral triangles have been used in engineering, architecture and design through the ages.

Video

The amazing 'angle-a-tron'

Lost your protractor? Well, find out how to make an 'angle-a-tron'. This might just be the coolest mathematical tool you've ever used. Measure all sorts of angles. It's easy with an angle-a-tron!

Video

Maths inside bees and beehives

Bees are necessary for assisting many plants to produce the food we eat, including meat and milk. Colony collapse disorder, which describes the disappearance of beehives, could have catastrophic effects on food production. Australian scientists are applying their maths and science knowledge to build up a picture of a healthy ...

Video

What are pixels?

Meet Kevin Systrom and Piper Hanson as they explain how digital images work. What are pixels, those tiny dots of light, made from? How are colours created and represented? What does Kevin say about the way mathematical functions are used to create different image filters. What is the difference between image resolution ...

Video

Area of a square and a triangle

Do you know the formula for working out the area of a square? How about a triangle? Watch this short maths video to learn the formulas for both.

Video

MathXplosion, Ep 33: On the grid

Explore graphs, grids and mapping with a focus on reading and writing location data using coordinate geometry. Grids and maps illustrate the concepts of parallel/perpendicular lines (axes or labelled number lines), ordered pairs and intersection points.

Video

Types of triangles

What is the difference between equilateral, isosceles and scalene triangles? See if you can find and classify triangles based on the definitions given in this maths video.

Video

MathXplosion, Ep 50: How to use a tetrahedron to solve the tree problem

How can you place four trees exactly the same distance apart from one other? By making a model! By using miniature trees to make a model of the problem, it becomes clear that a 2D solution is impossible. We learn how objects can help us visualise the problem situation, which in this case requires a 3D solution: a tetrahedron.

Video

Comparing fuel consumption

Is it more fuel efficient to drive or fly between two places? Watch this clip and learn how to calculate the answer. What are the various factors that need to be taken into account? This video was made using the American measurement of gallons per hour, American firgures for the average number of passengers in a car and ...