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English / Year 5 / Language / Phonics and word knowledge

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how to use knowledge of known words, base words, prefixes and suffixes, word origins, letter patterns and spelling generalisations to spell new words (ACELA1513)

Elaborations
  • talking about how suffixes change over time and new forms are invented to reflect changing attitudes to gender, for example policewoman or salesperson
  • using knowledge of known words and base words to spell new words, for example the spelling and meaning connections between ‘vision’, ‘television’ and ‘revision’
  • learning that many complex words were originally hyphenated but are now written without a hyphen, for example ‘uncommon, ‘renew’, ‘email’ and ‘refine’
  • applying knowledge of spelling generalisations to spell new words, for example ‘suitable’, ‘likeable’ and ‘collapsible’
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
ScOT terms

Word formation,  Language conventions,  Morphemes,  Spelling

Online

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