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Science / Year 8 / Science as a Human Endeavour / Nature and development of science

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE134)

Elaborations
  • investigating developments in the understanding of cells and how this knowledge has impacted on areas such as health and medicine
  • discovering how people’s understanding of the nature of matter has changed over time as evidence for particle theory has become available through developments in technology
  • considering how the idea of elements has developed over time as knowledge of the nature of matter has improved
  • investigating the development of the microscope and the impact it has had on the understanding of cell functions and division
ScOT terms

Evidence,  Paradigms,  Observations (Data)

Audio

Chemicals on the Great Barrier Reef

This program deals with a range of human impacts on the Great Barrier Reef. Herbicides from land runoff have been traced to algae and sea grasses in river mouths and coastal zones along the Great Barrier Reef. Effects include retardation of photosynthesis and growth of corals. Other pressures on the reef include high water ...

Audio

Lakes in Antarctica

Scientists are not complacent. We still have a lot to learn about the water cycle. The discovery of glacial lakes under the ice in Antarctica actively transporting water between reservoirs was a surprise. These lakes can be up to 3km beneath the ice sheets. The pressure of the ice above helps to melt the ice, forming lakes. ...

Video

Space storms

This 11 minute video segment from Catalyst explains how the sun can impact on Earth's power grid and satellite communications. This program also describes recent technology to study the sun and understand the causes of coronal mass ejections.

Interactive

Science Talk 2007: Tim Entwistle

An interview and tour of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Sydney and its herbarium with Dr Tim Entwistle, a plant scientist and the NSW Government Botanist. Tim talks to a pre-service teacher from Macquarie University about his love of plants, in particular freshwater algae. In the herbarium we find out why it is so important ...

Video

Robot biomimicry

This 9 minute video segment from Catalyst shows how inspiration from the world of animals has helped in the mechanical design of robots and adhesive materials.

Interactive

Thermal comfort – sustainability action process (Years 7–10)

This thermal comfort learning resource will guide students through an extended school based investigation. Students will develop and implement a chosen sustainability action and then evaluate and reflect on their success and their learning.

Video

Graphene: the new wonder material

Graphene is perhaps the most significant new material produced in recent years. It has many potential applications in electrical devices, biomedical technology and solar energy. Graphene is a form (allotrope) of carbon with some special chemical and physical properties. Watch this clip to explore the molecular structure, ...

Video

Below Earth's crust

Imagine tunnelling deep, deep below the Earth's surface. What do you think you would find thousands of kilometres down? Watch this clip to find out what is inside the Earth, what it's made up of and how hot it is. Find out about earthquakes, volcanoes, and geysers, and how they help us to understand about the composition ...

Video

What are microbes?

What are microbes? What are the four major groups that most microbes belong to? Listen as Dr Taghrid Istivan explains where microbes are found. What is the name of the group of microbes she describes as beneficial to our health? Can you explain what happens when people get food poisoning?

Video

Building new antibiotics

Scientists have been researching and tackling the problem of antibiotic resistance in recent years. Professor Andrew Myers and his team may have found one solution to this problem. What is it? See if you can find some other examples where scientists have come up with potential solutions.

Video

Antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections and diseases caused by bacteria. Unfortunately, bacteria has an enormous capacity to adapt, which means they become immune to antibiotics. What are the repercussions of bacteria in our bodies becoming resistant to antibiotics and why could this present a big problem to human health?

Online

Tasty science: Connected Learning Experience

This Connected Learning Experience (CLE) students explore the digestive system in higher animals. In this investigation, the specialised structures and functions of cells in the tongue are explored to determine how this organ helps animals survive. Claims regarding the taste map of the tongue, published in 1901, are evaluated ...

Online

Cells and the molecules of life

Take a look at cells, and some of their components, starting from the very beginning of life on Earth. Speculate on the origin of the molecules of life and investigate how they combine to create the structure and function of cells.

Video

Fossils and the evolution of life

Have you ever wondered how scientists know when the early mammals appeared on Earth, or how long ago dinosaurs died out? Watch this clip to discover the role of fossils, and the rocks they are found in, in revealing the order and history of life on Earth. This clip takes you to fossil sites in Queensland; and to Shark Bay ...

Audio

Puzzling migration of eels and monarch butterflies

Scientists have many questions about the migratory habits of eels and monarch butterflies, and new research uncovers some of the secrets. Watch this clip to discover how satellite technology is helping to track eels. You'll also find out what organs are involved in helping monarch butterflies find their way. You will be ...

Video

Testing the 5-second rule

When it comes to dropping food, have you heard of the 5-second rule? Or the 3-second rule? Watch this video to learn what really happens when you drop food. In order to cause disease, what must bacteria do? What circumstances allow bacteria and viruses to contaminate food more successfully?

Text

The Conversation - issues concerning self and identity - organ donation

This resource contains a series of articles about organ donation, including ethical consideration of the role of family; research methods available to increase donor rates; and examples from other countries (e.g. Spain) that have high organ donation rates. It can be used to consider a wide range of issues, evidence, and ...

Video

Diprotodon: fossils and extinction

When did Diprotodon die out? To answer this question, teams of scientists and volunteers are working together to excavate Diprotodon bones and study the landscape where they're found. Go on the road with Catalyst to the 'badlands' of South Australia and investigate the evidence behind Diprotodon extinction.

Video

Combatting antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is developing into a big health problem in today's society. As we become more resistant to these drugs, it becomes harder for bacterial infections and diseases to be treated. What are some potential solutions to this problem? Find out in this clip from ABC Catalyst.

Online

Earth rocks

Explore how forces and energy are continually shaping and changing the Earth's surface. Find out about fast and slow changes and the connection between them first observed by English scientist Charles Lyell. Discover the Earth's age, how rocks form, what they contain, and what they reveal about the Earth's long history.