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Science / Year 7 / Science as a Human Endeavour / Nature and development of science

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Science knowledge can develop through collaboration across the disciplines of science and the contributions of people from a range of cultures (ACSHE223)

Elaborations
  • considering how water use and management relies on knowledge from different areas of science, and involves the application of technology
  • identifying the contributions of Australian scientists to the study of human impact on environments and to local environmental management projects
  • investigating how land management practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can help inform sustainable management of the environment
  • studying transnational collaborative research in the Antarctic
  • recognising that traditional and Western scientific knowledge can be used in combination to care for Country/Place
General capabilities
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Scientific inquiry,  Interdisciplinary research

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