Science / Year 9 / Science as a Human Endeavour / Use and influence of science

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research (ACSHE228)

Elaborations
  • considering how technologies have been developed to meet the increasing needs for mobile communication
  • investigating how scientific and technological advances have been applied to minimising pollution from industry
  • considering how choices related to the use of fuels are influenced by environmental considerations
  • investigating the work of Australian scientists such as Fiona Wood and Marie Stoner on artificial skin
  • considering safe sound levels for humans and implications in the workplace and leisure activities
  • investigating contemporary science issues related to living in a Pacific country located near plate boundaries, for example Japan, Indonesia, New Zealand
General capabilities
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
ScOT terms

Values (Psychology)

Video

How do touchscreens work?

Ever wondered how swiping your finger makes a touchscreen work? In this animation, see how invisible electric fields mess with your finger so your phone can pinpoint what you're touching.

Video

BTN: New Zealand's earthquakes

Damaged buildings, flooded roads, and crashed cars! No, it's not a bad dream; it's actually the aftermath of an earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2011. Find out about what causes earthquakes, the damage they cause, and why Christchurch was rocked by two quakes within six months. This clip includes footage of earthquake ...

Video

Catalyst: Tsunami prevention in the Pacific

By investigating sediments and debris left by devastating tsunamis throughout history, Japanese scientists are making discoveries that change the way we understand disaster prevention in the Pacific. Watch as research teams examine rocks and mud layers; create digital simulations of past tsunamis; and investigate the seabed ...

Video

Sciencey: Five things you need to know about climate change

Find out how carbon dioxide makes the Earth warmer, how oceans store heat and the way we can see climate history in ice. What are the consequences of changes in the global climate? What can we do as individuals and communities to stop these negative changes?

Video

Catalyst: How high will sea levels rise?

Much of the world’s population will eventually have to deal with the consequences of sea-level rise, but the question is: how high will the water get? Dr Graham Phillips investigates how scientists are turning to the distant past to predict the impact of rising sea levels. Watch scientists explore 120,000-year-old coastlines, ...

Video

Can photons and atoms generate laser?

Electrons around atoms can absorb and emit photons of particular colours of light – see three different atomic models explain what's going on.

Video

Graphene: The new wonder material

Graphene is perhaps the most significant new material produced in recent years. It has many potential applications in electrical devices, biomedical technology and solar energy. Graphene is a form (allotrope) of carbon with some special chemical and physical properties. Watch this clip to explore the molecular structure, ...

Video

BTN: Tsunamis

Discover what powerful force triggers a tsunami. In this clip you will see the damage caused by tsunami, and find out why it occurred. Learn about what is happening on the ocean floor and the connection between tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes and tectonic plates. See how a warning centre is working to keep people safe ...

Video

BTN: Volcanoes and people

Imagine living in the shadow of a volcano? Well, millions of people do in Naples, Italy, where a massive volcano called Vesuvius exists. This clip explores the dangers posed by volcanoes and investigates some recent and ancient eruptions. Find out some misconceptions about volcanoes and discover how science is helping prevent ...

Video

Catalyst: Plants and increased levels of carbon dioxide

We know that most plants use carbon dioxide to make their own food. So what might plants look like in 100 years if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase - will they become enormous and overtake our backyards? View the possible effects of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide on plants and, in turn, humans and other animals.

Video

Catalyst: When does life begin?

The use of embryonic stem cells for medical research is a hotly debated ethical issue, with much of the discussion focusing on when human life begins. Listen to the views both of scientists and of some people from several faith traditions. In a major stem-cell breakthrough, scientists have discovered a new type of stem ...

Video

Catalyst: Predicting earthquakes

Will scientists ever be able to accurately predict earthquakes? Imagine the number of lives that could be saved if this were possible. Dr Maryanne Demasi joins a group of researchers drilling into one of the most earthquake-prone regions on Earth as they try to improve earthquake prediction to add precious seconds to earthquake ...

Video

BTN: Cancer - when the baddies take over

Cancer is a major disease in Australia and there are many different types, including leukaemia, and breast and skin cancers. View this clip to discover more about how cancer forms, why it occurs, and what cancer research is being done.

Video

Catalyst: Supercapacitors: new battery technology

Discover how nanotechnology is contributing to the creation of new, improved batteries that may soon be used in all our mobile phones and portable music devices - even in cars and trams. Catalyst's Tanya Ha looks at how traditional batteries produce electricity and how their efficiency may be increased by tiny devices known ...

Audio

Mercury is released as coal is burnt in power stations

This resource describes research into environmental disease resulting from the heavy metal mercury. It is estimated 60,000 babies are born each year in the United States with mercury-related diseases from the burning of coal in power stations. World wide, this is a significant problem. Mercury also enters the environment ...

Video

Planes, Trains and Autism

This 7 minute video segment from Catalyst explains how science has been applied to helping to deal with behaviours associated with Asperger's syndrome.

Interactive

Vaccines

Students use this resource consisting of eleven slides with diagrams, written explanation and voice-over to understand that immunisations and medicines can be used to help the body fight infections. There is a two-question quiz and a summary slide.

Video

Dr Ove Goegh-Guldberg

This 5 minute video segment from Catalyst highlights the vulnerability of some of our ecosystems and the way abiotic factors can have a dramatic effect. It also exemplifies the difficult process of having new scientific ideas accepted.

Video

CMT disease

This seven and a half minute video segment from Catalyst describes CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) is Australia's most common genetic neurological disorder. Vitamin C, particularly when taken at a young age appears to reverse this effect. A good example of the scientific method.

Audio

Coastal erosion and king tides

A friendly discussion about the economic and environmental impacts of ways of dealing with the problems of simultaneous king tides and tidal surges associated with storms from a Californian perspective. Download the audio or view the transcript of this ABC radio interview.