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Science / Year 8 / Science Understanding / Chemical sciences

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Properties of the different states of matter can be explained in terms of the motion and arrangement of particles (ACSSU151)

Elaborations
  • explaining why a model for the structure of matter is needed
  • modelling the arrangement of particles in solids, liquids and gases
  • using the particle model to explain observed phenomena linking the energy of particles to temperature changes
ScOT terms

States of matter,  Properties of matter,  Molecular motion

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