Digital technologies / Year 7 and 8 / Digital Technologies Processes and Production Skills

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Define and decompose real-world problems taking into account functional requirements and economic, environmental, social, technical and usability constraints (ACTDIP027)

Elaborations
  • determining the factors that influence proposed solution ideas, for example user age affects the language used for instructions, dexterity affects the size of buttons and links, hearing or vision loss influence captioned or audio-described multimedia as alternative ways that common information is presented on a website
  • investigating types of environmental constraints of solutions, for example reducing energy consumption and on-screen output of solutions
  • identifying that problems can be decomposed into sub elements, for example creating a decision tree to represent the breakdown and relationships of sub elements to the main problem or identifying the elements of game design such as characters, movements, collisions and scoring
  • starting from a simplified system, gradually increase complexity until a model of a real-world system is developed, and record the difficulties associated with each stage of implementation
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • ICT capability Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Information and communication technologies,  Problem solving,  Functionality,  Usability

Online

Computational thinking

Find out about Computational thinking. Use this topic from the Digital Technologies Hub to learn more, get ideas about how to teach about it, find out what other schools are doing and use the applications and games in the classroom.

Online

Design thinking

Find out about Design thinking. Use this topic from the Digital Technologies Hub to learn more, get ideas about how to teach about it, find out what other schools are doing and use the applications and games in the classroom.

Interactive

Design thinking across the curriculum

This cross-curriculum resource is designed to introduce Stage 2, 3 and 4 students to the design thinking process through a series of videos and interactive activities. This resource is also downloadable as a SCORM file: the downloaded version will only work if you upload it to a webserver, such as Moodle or Canvas.

Interactive

Refugees welcome here

This resource embeds the use of online collaboration tools and 21st century learning skills in a student-centered hands-on project designed to welcome refugees into their community. The syllabus outcomes are aligned to NSW Stage 4 English, Geography or Visual Arts but this could be used with older or younger students by ...

Online

There can only be one

In this lesson sequence students write a simple suite of programs that can be used to facilitate an S.R.C. election though the collection and processing of data. It assumes that students have been introduced to Python programming language.

Video

Making games with Benjamin

Find out why teenage game-maker Benjamin started coding. What is his advice for new game-makers? Why is Benjamin excited about the possibilities that virtual reality (VR) offers for gaming? If you don't know much about VR do some research online. Think about how it will change the playing and creation of games.

Video

How do computers get hacked?

What are some examples of cyber crime? Watch this clip to find out how viruses, denial of service attacks (DDoS) and phishing scams work. What is a botnet? And how are they used by hackers to bring down websites? Most of the time computers get hacked because of simple mistakes users make. What can users do to better protect ...

Video

What makes the internet run reliably?

Watch this clip to see software engineer Lynn Root and co-creator of the internet Vint Cerf explain what keeps the internet running reliably. When information is sent on the internet, it is broken down into packets that are able to take a number of routes to get from one computer to another. Why might this be important? ...

Online

Drone search lesson

This lesson plan introduces students to the practice and applications of using drones to take aerial photographs. Students learn safety procedures regarding the use of drones then capture images of simulated disaster areas. Students observe the use of drones in science and technology-based endeavours and suggest new applications ...

Video

How computers compute

Watch as Jamie Teherani from MIT, demonstrates how a big, mechanical computer made from wood works. What does it have in common with the high-tech computers of today?

Online

Digital Technologies Hub

The Digital Technologies Hub is a website that supports Australian primary teachers, secondary teachers, students, school leaders and school communities in engaging with the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies. The hub provides scaffolded support for teachers and many of the resources will assist those getting started ...

Online

Travel safe

In this series of lessons, students use a basic programming language to design and create an app for younger students to encourage them to use public transport safely. They explore basic user-interface principles and take into account aesthetics and the development of a positive user experience. Their goal is to create ...

Video

What are pixels?

Meet Kevin Systrom and Piper Hanson as they explain how digital images work. What are pixels, those tiny dots of light, made from? How are colours created and represented? What does Kevin say about the way mathematical functions are used to create different image filters. What is the difference between image resolution ...

Video

Learning about computer languages

What happens when you type a web address or url into your computer and press enter? Watch this clip to find out! Computers and servers talk to each other in a language called HTTP. What are the messages they send and recieve mostly about? HTML is another language, one that tells a web browser how to make a web page look. ...

Video

What happens to your online data?

There is an infinite amount of data online, but where does it all come from? Would you be surprised to learn that every time you go online you're contributing to the creation of new data? Find out how data is created, processed, stored and retrieved online.

Video

Unplugged Activity: My Robotic Friends

This video introduces one of code.org's unplugged activities and provides an introduction to programming without the use of computers. One group of students take on the role of "programmer", drawing arrows on paper to guide the other group of students, the "robots" to build a stack of cups in a particular configuration. ...

Video

Unplugged Activity: Computational Thinking

This video introduces one of code.org's unplugged activities. It discusses a lesson on Computational Thinking, designed to show you how to take a big difficult problem and turn it into several simpler problems. The goal of the lesson is for a group of students to write a set of instructions for another group of students ...

Video

Combatting hackers

Did you know that simply by being connected to the internet, your devices like computers, phones and TVs could be hacked? What are the implications of having your connected devices hacked? And why might some industry and governments want to encourage hackers within their own organisations?

Online

Cybersafety

Try some of these games, videos, activities and tools to help your students make the right decisions when using the Internet. These links are from the Digital Technologies Hub which is a website that supports Australian primary teachers, secondary teachers, students, school leaders and school communities in engaging with ...

Video

How 'binary information' is communicated via the internet

Ever wondered how your photos, emails and messages get sent between devices? Watch as software engineer Tess Winlock explains what binary information is, and how it gets from one place to another. Can you explain what 'bits' are? How about 'bytes'? In the past, binary information was sent using physical systems like semaphore ...