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Listed under:  Science  >  Earth and space  >  Geographic location  >  Surveying (Geography)  >  Exploration
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Sites2See: HM Bark Endeavour

A resource page about the HM Bark Endeavour, the ship used by Captain James Cook in his first voyage of discovery. The page includes selected links to information about the scientific, political and cultural impact of the Endeavour's journey. Suitable for teachers and students.

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Captain Cook's navigational instruments

This resource includes a small magnifying glass and a plane table frame used on Captain James Cook's voyages for navigation and surveying.

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Mapping the Australian Coast

This collection focuses on the European mapping and naming of the Australian continent during the 17th and 18th centuries. It highlights the motivations and achievements of Dutch and British explorers, including Abel Tasman and James Cook. It incorporates maps, texts, and a painting.

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The convict voyages

What do you think it was like for convicts on their voyage from England to Australia? Would you be surprised to discover that their life expectancy on board a convict vessel was actually higher than that of free settlers? Watch this video to discover why this might be, and learn about the convicts themselves.

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How did the world become interconnected?

This 10 minute video in 3 parts offers an overview of the growth of information networks through developments in the technologies of communication and transportation. Part 1 discusses how writing, inventions of paper and printing improved communication between societies and the development of transport and courier systems ...

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All things necessary for a happy life

Hear a passage from Lieutenant James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. In this entry for 24 August 1770, Cook reflects on the lives of the Guugu Yimithirr people and why they seemed more contented than European people at that time. This audio clip is fourth in a series of six.

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Dogs that hop along on two legs?

Hear a passage from Captain James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. This entry for 26 August 1770 includes a record of some of the animal species the British observed while they camped in the Endeavour River area. This audio clip is fifth in a series of six.

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Getting to know the locals

Hear a passage from Lieutenant James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. In this entry for 10 July 1770, Cook describes a meeting with several local Guugu Yimithirr men who were fishing nearby. The British crew had set up camp in the area that is now Cooktown, on Cape York's east coast. This audio clip is the second ...

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Trouble over turtles

Hear a passage from Lieutenant James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. In this entry for 19 July 1770, relations between the British visitors and the local Aboriginal people are strained. The Guugu Yimithirr people appear to object to the British visitors hunting turtles in the waters of their home. This audio clip ...

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Newcomers explore an ancient land

Hear a passage from Lieutenant James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. In this entry for 9 July 1770, botanist Joseph Banks and Lieutenant John Gore explore the Endeavour River area on the east coast of Cape York. This audio clip is the first in a series of six.

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Mapping the age of discovery

Maps may be used to find treasure but this one is a treasure! A rare map found by chance brings to life one of the most significant voyages in history, when Ferdinand Magellan travelled west from Spain to the East Indies (Indonesia). Although Magellan was killed en route, his crew were the first Europeans to circumnavigate ...

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Harvests and hazards in the seas

Hear a passage from Captain James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. This entry includes observations of the sea life that the British crew observed around the Endeavour River where they camped for seven weeks. This is the final audio clip in a series of six.

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Impact of European settlement on Aboriginal Tasmanians

Aboriginal Tasmanians had inhabited Tasmania for over 40,000 years before the arrival of European settlers. What do you think life was like for Aboriginal Tasmanians before then? Why might have they embarked on a war, called the 'Black War', once settlers began arriving in Tasmania, despite existing relatively peacefully ...

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James Cook - finding your way

If you decide to visit somewhere you've never been before, how do you find your way? If you're in a car, the driver might use a GPS. You might use a smartphone app to give you directions. Perhaps you might go really ‘old school' and use a printed map or street directory. But how did explorers navigate their way around the ...

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Burke and Wills: Then and Now

This is a website about a journey in 2010 that retraced the 1860 Burke and Wills expedition from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria. Topics include: the landscape, the route, the flora and fauna, Burke’s tree, aboriginal bush foods and various interviews with experts and involved individuals. The resource is presented ...

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Captain James Cook

This sequence of three learning activities about the voyages of Captain James Cook includes a short film, 'Mapping Australia' and uses images of items from the library's collection. Students will curate their own museum. They will develop their skills of historical inquiry and discussion.

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Mapping the Australian Coast

This collection focuses on the European mapping and naming of the Australian continent during the 17th and 18th centuries. It highlights the motivations and achievements of Dutch and British explorers, including Abel Tasman and James Cook. It incorporates maps, texts and a painting.

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Creating computer games

How are computer games made? Find out about the skills and knowledge required to create a computer game in this video. What are some of the roles of the people interviewed? See if you can find out more about what kind of skills and knowledge might be required in each role.

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'Classifying the treasures', 1929-31

This is a black-and-white photograph taken by Frank Hurley of an evening scene in the wardroom of the ship 'Discovery' during the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) to Antarctica, 1929-31. The title typed on its cardboard mount calls the picture 'Classifying the Treasures' and indicates ...

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The 'Dig' tree in 1878

This is a watercolour by Arthur Esam (1850-1938), created in 1878 and measuring a modest 32.5 cm x 26.7 cm. It shows a coolibah tree with two sections of bark missing - the famous 'Dig' tree of the Burke and Wills Expedition of 1861. A man (perhaps Esam himself) is standing holding the reins of a horse, and appears to be ...