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Listed under:  Science  >  Earth and space  >  Landforms  >  Rivers
Interactive resource

River journey [no spoken instructions]

Sample water along a river. Check water temperature, salinity, clarity and current speed. Link aquatic animals with their habitats according to water types.

Interactive resource

Water types [no spoken instructions]

Test water samples for salinity levels and sediment content. The samples have been collected from five different places: dam, stream, river, river mouth and ocean. Compare the water properties, then match the samples with their original locations.

Interactive resource

River journey [includes spoken instructions]

Sample water along a river. Check water temperature, salinity, clarity and current speed. Link aquatic animals with their habitats according to water types.

Interactive resource

Water types [includes spoken instructions]

Test water samples for salinity levels and sediment content. The samples have been collected from five different places: dam, stream, river, river mouth and ocean. Compare the water properties, then match the samples with their original locations.

StillImage

Snowy River at Jindabyne, c1900

This is a silver gelatin full plate glass negative entitled 'Snowy River at Jindabyne' taken by Kerry and Co, of Sydney. It was taken at some stage between 1884 and 1917, and shows the Snowy River near Jindabyne in the Snowy Mountains region of New South Wales. The river is in the centre of the image, extending to mountains ...

StillImage

Kodak factory site with market gardens in Abbotsford, 1939-45

This is a black-and-white gelatin photograph of the Kodak factory site in Abbotsford, Melbourne, taken around the time of the Second World War. The factory sits on the banks of the Yarra River. In the left foreground are market gardens fenced off from the main factory site, which includes an array of buildings, two chimneys ...

StillImage

Kodak factory in Abbotsford viewed from across the Yarra River, c1930s

This is a black-and-white sepia-toned photograph showing the exterior of the Kodak factory in Abbotsford, Melbourne, as viewed from across the Yarra River, in about the 1930s. A cluster of buildings, towers, chimneys and a large tank can be seen by the far side of the river, while in the foreground are trees and grass. ...

StillImage

Aerial view of woodchip mill beside a river, 1970-80

This is a colour image from the original negative depicting an aerial view of a small woodchip mill in operation. Visible are roads, various buildings and an area with chimneys emitting smoke. The mill is in an area with a considerable number of trees. In the foreground is a hill which has very few trees. The mill is located ...

StillImage

Girls in knitted bathers at the Yarra River, 1942

This is a sepia photograph showng Alma and Pauline Leibig by the Yarra River at Warrandyte in the hills outside Melbourne in 1942. Pauline and her sister are wearing knitted bathers. They are holding hands and smiling at the camera.

StillImage

'Working together to save water' booklet, 2003

This illustrated 18-page booklet promotes water conservation. It was published in October 2003 by the Victorian Department of Sustainability and Environment. On the blue-and-white cover, the title of the booklet, 'Working together to save water', is set against a background design of water rippling. At the bottom right ...

Moving Image

Hawkesbury River: tourism and river health

The Hawkesbury-Nepean river catchment provides a useful example of river management issues. This clip shows conservationist canoeists completing their journey along the Hawkesbury River in the 'Source to Sea' project. See what's being done to protect a fragile ecosystem of the river: seagrass. Find out how increased demand ...

Moving Image

Dire warning for Lake Eyre

Lake Eyre is located in northern South Australia and receives its water from the rivers in south west and central Queensland. This news story focuses on the impact of changes proposed by the Queensland Government to the upstream river system and responses to these changes.

Moving Image

Water sponge beneath our feet

Could it be that nature has its own system of creating water reserves to help the country get through dry times? Peter Andrews thinks so. His approach provides an alternative to the way most farmers manage water resources. But some of Peter's ideas have caused ripples of discontent, especially among authorities and his neighbours.

Moving Image

Rivers of power

Join canyoning instructor Zak Griffiths as he investigates a river's incredible force and energy. See how features of the river can change from one day to the next. View an animation showing how various materials in the river are transported by moving water.

Moving Image

River flow vs particle size

Moving water can be a powerful force of nature. The speed of the water flow directly affects particle movement (transportation and deposition). See how the Hjulstrom Curve graph helps understand erosion by plotting the relationship between particle size and river velocity.

Moving Image

Platypus at play

The platypus is an egg-laying mammal, perfectly adapted to its watery home in Australia's freshwater lakes, rivers and streams. With its streamlined body, webbed feet like paddles and broad tail, it dives and swims underwater in search of food. Catch a rare glimpse of this Australian animal in its natural habitat.

Moving Image

Show me the water!

Where does the water in your tap come from? Fresh water accounts for only 3% of the earth's water supply and only 1% of that is available to us in lakes and rivers or in the atmosphere. But how much do we use for drinking water and what else do we use fresh water for? Watch this video to find out how NASA's Global Precipitation ...

Moving Image

Navigating the waterways of literature

Have you read The Wind in the Willows? Author Kenneth Grahame describes a river as 'a babbling procession of the best stories in the world sent from the heart of the Earth to be told at last to the insatiable sea.' Listen as four British authors reflect on the changeable nature of water and the difficulties they experience ...

Interactive resource

Map tool: South-East Asia and the Mekong River

Trace the path of the Mekong River through China, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Explore how these countries use resources from the river. For example, look at which countries have built dams to generate hydro-electric power. Explore issues such as river pollution.

Interactive resource

New developments [includes spoken instructions]

Survey populations of mammals and birds. Test how urban development impacts on wildlife. Notice the balance between development and wildlife conservation. Explore interactions between national parks, creeks, wetlands, bridges, towns and farms.