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Video

Catalyst: Plants and increased levels of carbon dioxide

We know that most plants use carbon dioxide to make their own food. So what might plants look like in 100 years if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase - will they become enormous and overtake our backyards? View the possible effects of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide on plants and, in turn, humans and other animals.

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Catalyst: Seals help climate research

Discover how seals are helping scientists study Antarctica, polar regions, oceans and climate change. Scientists use Weddell and southern elephant seals to gather data and monitor the way currents move heat around the world's oceans.

Video

Landline: Spinifex research

What does spinifex grass contain that might prove useful in modern buildings? Watch this clip and discover how Aboriginal knowledge, combined with Western science, is unlocking the potential of spinifex. Find out about this natural resource and how it could become a new, sustainable material for the building industry.

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Catalyst: Water through cracked soil

Watch scientists investigate water movement through soil that has been cracked by drought. Australian scientists demonstrate a new way to investigate how water moves through the cracks using electrical probes to measure soil moisture at different soil depths. This technology could help farmers more efficiently irrigate ...

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Catalyst: The home of Australian science

Australia has a long and proud history of excellence in science. How should we celebrate this? Watch this clip to find out about an Australian organisation that recognises and promotes outstanding scientific achievement. You'll also find why its Canberra headquarters is referred to as 'the flying saucer'!

Video

Catalyst: Thinning ice sheet

Discover that that the massive ice sheet in East Antarctica has been losing mass since 2006 instead of growing, as was previously thought. Watch animations to see how scientists from NASA and Australia are using satellite technology and aerial monitoring to investigate the thickness of East Antarctica's ice sheet. Find ...

Video

Catalyst: Climate and bushfires in Australia

What can science tell us about the major cause of bushfires in Australia's past? How can it help us predict future bushfires? Two scientists discuss evidence related to bushfire regimes (bushfire patterns, types and intensity). Please note that this clip contains recent images of homes destroyed by fire that may disturb ...

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Catalyst: Geoengineering - a solution to climate change?

What is geoengineering, and how is it being investigated by scientists as a means of combating climate change? Learn about some climate control techniques that could slow down or even reverse the effects of global warming. Hear an atmospheric physicist explain the pros and cons of geoengineering techniques.

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ABC News: Supporting sustainable farming

Consider the vast land that is Australia. How might we, as a community, help to keep our land sustainable? Explore the ideas put forward by Professor Peter Cullen and Dr John Williams in response to the continuing drought conditions of 2003. What role could city dwellers play so that farmers could better care for the land?

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BTN: Living on the International Space Station

What would it be like to live on a space station? In this clip you'll see footage of astronauts on the International Space Station and discover what their daily life is like. You'll also find out about how the space station was built and about some important research being done there.

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Landline: Winning the race to feed a growing population

The race is on to produce higher crop-yielding plants that will feed an ever-growing world population. See how scientists at the Plant Accelerator facility are investigating ways of increasing crop production. Some are focusing on conventional plant-breeding techniques while others are using GM (genetic modification) technology.

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Catalyst: Growing avocados

Demand for certain kinds of food changes with time as people's tastes change. Avocados were not always popular, but in recent years their popularity has increased so much that supply cannot keep up with demand. Learn how stem cell scientists at the University of Queensland are leading the way in research that could cut ...

Video

Catalyst: Snapshots of top Australian scientists

Australia has produced many of the world's top scientists. Watch this clip to discover who some of them are. Explore the scientific discoveries that made them famous, and how they changed our understanding of the world.

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Collaborating in science

This is a colour video clip in which Professor Keith Hunter, a marine chemist from the University of Otago in New Zealand, relates how he became aware of the need to collaborate with scientists from other fields and to work on interdisciplinary problems in multidisciplinary teams. Sequences showing Professor Hunter discussing ...

Interactive

Environmental forensics at sea

The main screen shows a marine environment and research boat against a background of coastal hills and a fiord. There are two entry points for investigation: Phytoplankton clues and Sediment cores, containing five interviews with a scientist explaining how science investigations can be used as a forensic tool to investigate ...

Video

Our role in ocean acidification

This is a colour video clip of marine scientist Abby Smith discussing the effects of increased levels of carbon dioxide on marine animals. Smith is a teacher and researcher at the University of Otago, New Zealand.

Video

Ocean acidification

This is a colour video clip of marine scientist Abby Smith discussing the process of ocean acidification and the effects on marine animals. Smith is a teacher and researcher at the University of Otago, New Zealand. The clip also shows some marine animals, and some activities that have led to ocean acidification including ...

Image

Working among vegetation on Antarctica

This is a colour photograph showing a scientist walking across the rocky surface of one of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. In the foreground, patches of moss and lichen can be seen growing around a shallow stream of meltwater.

Online

Energy, eaten alive!

Living things can be grouped by their external features and distinguished from non-living things. This inquiry-based sequence of eight lessons is based on current food security, sustainability and photosynthesis research. The experiments and activities include easy to set and see science displays, word games, practical ...

Online

Where the wild things grow

This sequence of five lessons explores plant adaptation and the unique features that enable them to survive. The picture book 'Where the Wild Things Are' by Maurice Sendak is used to engage students in a inquiry-based investigation that draws on current photosynthesis research. The unit includes easy to set and see science ...