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Listed under:  Science  >  Life  >  Ecosystems  >  Vegetation
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Don't get into a flap about elephant ears

It is now known that three species of elephants live across Africa and Asia: two in Africa and one in Asia. In this clip we look at how elephants from different climates have slightly different features and differ in size. Find out which elephants have the biggest ears and the wrinkliest skin - and why!

Interactive Resource

NSW ecosystems on show

This resource highlights fifteen natural ecosystems found in New South Wales. Each resource has been designed for students investigating ecosystem types in NSW, providing a greater understanding of their location, function, how they are impacted by human activity and how schools and communities can work to protect them. ...

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Dry dam, Brunchilly, NT, 1958

This is a 1958 black-and-white photograph showing the dried-up Waterdew Dam on Brunchilly Creek, which is located near Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory, about 500 kilometres north of Alice Springs. There are coolibah trees along the sides of the empty Dam. In the middle distance, a post-and-wire fence can be seen ...

StillImage

'Blackbutt Forest, North Coast', 1884-1917

This full plate glass negative was taken at some stage between 1884 and 1917. It depicts a man on a horse amidst very tall, thick trees in a forest. The caption, studio number and studio mark are inscribed on the reverse of the negative.

StillImage

'Lodore Fall, Blue Mountains', 1880-1900

This full plate glass negative of the Lodore Fall waterfall in the Blue Mountains was taken at some stage between 1880 and 1900. The image shows water flowing in a natural channel down a steep slope over rocks. A tree and ferns can be seen in the foreground. The caption, studio number and studio mark are inscribed on the ...

StillImage

Forest secrets

This website presents information about Victoria's tall timber forests, home of the mighty mountain ash, 'Eucalyptus regnans'.

Interactive Resource

Blue marble - SpatialGenie map layer

This is a world map, showing a detailed true-colour image of the Earth's surface. Students use the spatial visualisation tool, SpatialGenie, to explore this map as spatial data. They can investigate this map alone or add other map layers. Students use shape tools to measure area and distance, and they can also search for ...

Teacher resource

Why does the cacao tree need a tropical rainforest to grow?

This is a teaching-learning resource containing teaching strategies and student activities that support an investigation of the requirements for the survival of plants, focusing on cacao plants, the growing conditions of the biomes and bioregions in which they thrive, and how these can be affected by human activity. The ...

Teacher resource

How is a frog able to swim in trees?

This is a teaching-learning resource containing teaching strategies and student activities about the dependence of plants and animals on each other and the environment for survival. The resource has seven tabs, six of which are relevant. The first four set out the steps in the suggested pedagogical sequence and include ...

Teacher resource

Birds and coffee

This is a teaching-learning resource containing teaching strategies and student activities that support an investigation into the impact of different coffee production methods on biodiversity and, in particular, on migratory birds. The resource has seven tabs, six of which are relevant. The first four tabs set out the suggested ...

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Management of the northern savanna

Around the world, tropical savannas are in serious trouble. This clip from 2007 explores the use of Aboriginal technology for sustainable management of the environment in Australia's huge northern tropical savanna. Hear from two environmental scientists why traditional fire-management practices may reduce the incidence ...

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Food security in Australia

How much food does Australia produce, and what does this mean for food security in Australia? Watch this clip to find out about the factors that influence food production and crop yields, and also about the role that science and technology play. How will future population growth affect global food production and security?

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Timor-Leste: feeding the hungry

It is often hard for a developing country to grow enough food to feed its population. In this clip you'll see the challenges encountered by the growing nation of Timor-Leste (East Timor). Listen to an AusAID organiser and the East Timorese president describe the importance of food, and the heartbreak of a hungry nation.

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Palm oil

Palm oil is an ingredient in many everyday items, from ice-cream to shampoo. See how two friends created a social media campaign calling for palm oil to be sourced only from sustainable plantations. This clip from 2012 outlines some of the impacts of using uncertified palm oil and shows how average people can make a difference ...

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Bali and Sumba - paradise versus poverty

We all know the idyllic paradise called Bali, but have you ever heard of its poorer neighbour, the Indonesian island of Sumba, where the people struggle to grow food to eat? Watch this clip to learn about environmental conditions and agricultural challenges there. Find out also what people in Sumba are doing to prepare ...

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Wheat: from the UK with love

Not since colonial times has Australia imported wheat from the United Kingdom. Watch this clip to find out why Australia turned to Britain and the USA in 2002 for supplies of grain that are traditionally grown in abundance on home soil.

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Making a difference in the Daintree

Thousands of visitors flock to Queensland's Daintree rainforest region each year. See how a new ecotourism venture is not only improving the tourist experience, but also benefits the local Aboriginal community.

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An island where warm waters meet cool

Lord Howe Island lies off the east coast of Australia where warm, tropical seas meet cool currents from the south. Here, a mix of fish suited to warmer waters live together with fish suited to the cooler southern waters. Lord Howe Island has many reasons to be protected, such as being home to the world's most southern coral ...

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Prehistoric Wollemi Pine discovered

The 1994 discovery of the Wollemi Pine in the Blue Mountains was a momentous event, but the story doesn't end there. This ancient 'living fossil' species is millions of years old but was on the brink of extinction. Watch this clip to explore the remote canyon environments where it grows and find out about the remarkable ...

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Why are they called the Blue Mountains?

The Blue Mountains are home to many different species of eucalypt trees. See how a bushfire in the Blue Mountains is part of the cycle of life. Bushfire changes the landscape but also stimulates new growth and regeneration of the forest. Watch this clip to see the eucalypt forest before and after a fire.